Darcy's utopía

Front Cover
Penguin Books, Jul 1, 1992 - Fiction - 235 pages
1 Review
Eleanor Darcy, a woman of marginal genealogy and looks that play better than they should, is married to the economist to whom the Prime Minister listens. Determined to rip apart the old order and start fresh, Eleanor becomes the serpent-or angel-who whispers utopian visions in Julian Darcy's ear.With the husband in jail for imperiling the financial structure of the nation, Eleanor grants exclusive interviews to two journalists, Hugo Vansitart and Valerie Jones. Though they seem more preoccupied with each other than with their elusive subject, their goal is the same: to capture the essence of Eleanor Darcy. Hugo is loking for truth and pragmatism in Eleanor's vision: Valerie is in quest of the woman's struggle.From their diverse portraits, Eleanor Darcy emerges, and so does her remarkable vision-complete with shockingly sensible ideas about child-rearing, abortion, education, integration, fundamentalism, economics-and, of course, a new twist on that old story of the sexes.Fay Weldon has once again skewered the conventions of modern society with wit and wisdom, shining her flashlight on the threadbare morals of modern life.

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Darcy's utopia

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

On the eve of interviewing the fabulous and elusive Eleanor Darcy, journalists Valerie and Hugo meet and shack up in a hotel on the dubious strength of Hugo's credit card. As Eleanor (nee Apricot ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mbmackay - LibraryThing

Creatively written but ultimately a bit limited. Read Samoa Aug 2003 Read full review

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
17
Section 3
21
Section 4
27
Section 5
33
Section 6
38
Section 7
42
Section 8
45
Section 21
132
Section 22
140
Section 23
145
Section 24
151
Section 25
157
Section 26
159
Section 27
170
Section 28
175

Section 9
54
Section 10
58
Section 11
67
Section 12
72
Section 13
75
Section 14
84
Section 15
90
Section 16
102
Section 17
105
Section 18
111
Section 19
117
Section 20
120
Section 29
184
Section 30
188
Section 31
191
Section 32
198
Section 33
202
Section 34
210
Section 35
214
Section 36
221
Section 37
225
Section 38
229
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

Fay Weldon was born in Worcester, England, where her father was a physician and her mother a writer. She was educated at the University of St. Andrews, from which she received her M.A. in 1954. Six years later, she married Ronald Weldon. Weldon worked as a propaganda writer for the British Foreign Office and then as an advertising copywriter for various firms in London before making writing a full-time career. Since the mid-1960's she has written novels, short stories, and radio and television plays. The central subject of all Weldon's writing is the experience of women, especially their relationships with men. According to Weldon, "Women must ask themselves: What is it that will give me fulfillment? That's the serious question I'm attempting to answer." Despite her concern with women, Weldon has been criticized by some feminist groups for apparently presenting fictional women with very limited options. Weldon's style is marked by a careful attention to detail, vivid images, a sharp wit, and a wry sense of humor. Although most of her male characters are disagreeable, they are not the true villains of her novels. Her villains are, in fact, the traditional roles that men and women play. Weldon looks at women in many different circumstances - at work, at home, at play, in politics, and especially in love - and shows not only how they are manipulated by men, but also how they allow themselves to be manipulated. Recently, Weldon's novel The Life and Loves of a She-Devil (1983) has been made into a popular movie. It was formerly a successful television miniseries.

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