Dark Canon: 22 Stories of Fantasy and Fright by M. R. James

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Coachwhip Publications, 2010 - Fiction - 446 pages
5 Reviews
This collection brings together 22 short stories of M. R. James, from the dark fantasies of malevolent spirits and supernatural vengeance, to his lighter children's fantasy, The Five Jars. Stories include The Mezzotint, The Ash-Tree, Count Magnus, Casting the Runes, The Tractate Middoth, The Uncommon Prayer-Book, and many more.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stephenmurphy - LibraryThing

You cannot touch this guy for sheer, unheimlich shivering dread. A school story shat me up at university and just two months ago Tyhe Mezzotint put the willies right up me. Huhuhurr! Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wbwilburn5 - LibraryThing

Not at all what I expected, but interesting. Read full review

Contents

Canon Alberics ScrapBook
7
Lost Hearts
21
The AshTree
46
Number 13
62
Count Magnus
80
Oh Whistle and Ill Come to You My Lad
95
The Treasure of Abbot Thomas
117
A School Story
139
Martins Close
223
Mr Humphreys and His Inheritance
246
The Residence at Whitminster
276
The Diary of Mr Poynter
302
An Episode of Cathedral History
315
The Story of a Disappearance
334
Two Doctors
349
The Uncommon PrayerBook
359

The Tractate Middoth
160
Casting the Runes
179
The Stalls of Barchester Cathedral
204
The Five Jars
376
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About the author (2010)

M. R. James was born in Goodnestone, Kent, England on August 1, 1862. He was an English mediaeval scholar and provost of King's College, Cambridge (1905-1918) and of Eton College (1918-1936). He is best remembered for his ghost stories which are widely regarded as among the finest in English literature. He began writing his ghost stories as an entertainment for his friends; he would read these stories each year at Christmas to his colleagues at King's College. The earliest of these tales include Canon Alberic's Scrap-book and Lost Hearts, both of which were later collected in his first anthology of supernatural fiction, Ghost Stories of an Antiquary (1904). Perhaps his single greatest story is the profoundly disturbing Oh, Whistle, and I'll Come to You, My Lad (1904). He died on June 12, 1936.

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