Dark Mirrors: Azazel and Satanael in Early Jewish Demonology

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SUNY Press, 2011 - Religion - 217 pages
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Dark Mirrors is a wide-ranging study of two central figures in early Jewish demonology—the fallen angels Azazel and Satanael. Andrei A. Orlov explores the mediating role of these paradigmatic celestial rebels in the development of Jewish demonological traditions from Second Temple apocalypticism to later Jewish mysticism, such as that of the Hekhalot and Shi'ur Qomah materials. Throughout, Orlov makes use of Jewish pseudepigraphical materials in Slavonic that are not widely known.

Orlov traces the origins of Azazel and Satanael to different and competing mythologies of evil, one to the Fall in the Garden of Eden, the other to the revolt of angels in the antediluvian period. Although Azazel and Satanael are initially representatives of rival etiologies of corruption, in later Jewish and Christian demonological lore each is able to enter the other’s stories in new conceptual capacities. Dark Mirrors also examines the symmetrical patterns of early Jewish demonology that are often manifested in these fallen angels’ imitation of the attributes of various heavenly beings, including principal angels and even God himself.
 

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Contents

Symmetry of Good and Evil in Early Jewish Demonology
1
Kavod of Azazel in the Apocalypse of Abraham
11
The Scapegoat Ritual
27
1The Garment of Azazel in the Apocalypse of Abraham
47
The Fallen Angels Traditionsin 2 Slavonic Enoch
85
Apocalyptic Roles of the Adversary in the Temptation Narrative of theGospel of Matthew
107
The Garden Traditions in the Slavonic Version of 3 Baruch and the Book of Giants
113
Notes
127
Bibliography
179
Index
197
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About the author (2011)

Andrei A. Orlov is Associate Professor of Theology at Marquette University. He is the author of several books, including Selected Studies in the Slavonic Pseudepigrapha.

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