Dark Sun: the making of the hydrogen bomb

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Simon & Schuster, Aug 6, 1996 - History - 736 pages
8 Reviews
Here, for the first time, in a brilliant, panoramic portrait by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Making of the Atomic Bomb, is the definitive, often shocking story of the politics and the science behind the development of the hydrogen bomb and the birth of the Cold War. Based on secret files in the United States and the former Soviet Union, this monumental work of history discloses how and why the United States decided to create the bomb that would dominate world politics for more than forty years.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - SeriousGrace - LibraryThing

Not being a scientist and being even less interested in making a bomb of any sort, I found some of Rhodes's Dark Sun tedious. Having said that, I firmly believe to dumb it down for the sake of the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - chrisod - LibraryThing

An alternate, and more accurate subtitle for this book would be, “How the Soviets Stole The Bomb.” There is a fair amount of science in the book, and I had flashbacks to high school chemistry when ... Read full review

Contents

Smell of nuclear Powder
27
Diffusion
49
Material of Immense Value
66
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Richard Rhodes is the author of numerous books and the winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award. He graduated from Yale University and has received fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Appearing as host and correspondent for documentaries on public television’s Frontline and American Experience series, he has also been a visiting scholar at Harvard and MIT and is an affiliate of the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University. Visit his website: RichardRhodes.com

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