Darwin's Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution

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Simon and Schuster, Apr 4, 2001 - Science - 320 pages

The groundbreaking, "seminal work" (Time) on intelligent design that dares to ask, was Darwin wrong?


In 1996, Darwin's Black Box helped to launch the intelligent design movement: the argument that nature exhibits evidence of design, beyond Darwinian randomness. It sparked a national debate on evolution, which continues to intensify across the country. From one end of the spectrum to the other, Darwin's Black Box has established itself as the key intelligent design text -- the one argument that must be addressed in order to determine whether Darwinian evolution is sufficient to explain life as we know it.

In a major new Afterword for this edition, Behe explains that the complexity discovered by microbiologists has dramatically increased since the book was first published. That complexity is a continuing challenge to Darwinism, and evolutionists have had no success at explaining it. Darwin's Black Box is more important today than ever.
 

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Must have for anyone interested in apologetics

User Review  - JJPJ - Christianbook.com

My wife baught this for bme as a birthday gift a few years back and im so glad she did. Many times I have been faced with someone standing on the side of Scientific Naturalism. By using the ... Read full review

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Great book

Contents

Preface
Nuts and Bolts
EXAMINING THE CONTENTS OF THE
Road Kill
WHAT DOES THE BOX TELL
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Michael J. Behe is a Professor of Biological Science at Lehigh University, where he has worked since 1985. From 1978 to 1982 he did postdoctoral work on DNA structure at the National Institutes of Health. From 1982 to 1985 he was Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Queens College in New York City. He has authored more than forty technical papers, but he is best known as the author of Darwin's Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution. He lives near Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, with his wife and nine children.

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