Data Structures and Abstractions with Java

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Prentice Hall, 2007 - Computers - 998 pages

Using the latest features of Java 5, this unique object-oriented presentation introduces readers to data structures via thirty, manageable chapters.

 

KEY FeaturesTOPICS:

Introduces each ADT in its own chapter, including examples or applications. Provides  

aA variety of exercises and projects, plus additional self-assessment questions throughout. the text  

Includes generic data types as well as enumerations, for-each loops, the interface Iterable, the class Scanner, assert statements, and autoboxing and unboxing.

Identifies important Java code as a Listing. Provides

NNotes and Pprogramming Ttips in each chapter. For programmers and software engineers interested in learning more about data structures and abstractions.

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Contents

Introduction
1
Java Classes
5
B Exceptions
39
Copyright

35 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Frank M. Carrano is a professor emeritus of computer science at the University of Rhode Island. He received the Ph.D. degree in computer science from Syracuse University in 1969. His interests include data structures, computer science education, social issues in computing, and numerical computation. Professor Carrano is particularly interested in the design and delivery of undergraduate courses in computer science. He has authored several well-known computer science textbooks for undergraduates.

Frank's Making it Real blog http://frank-m-carrano.com/blog/ extends his textbooks and lectures to a lively discussion with instructors and students about teaching and learning computer science.

Follow Frank on Twitter: http://twitter.com/Frank_M_Carrano

Find him on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/makingitreal

Walter Savitch received the Ph.D. degree in Mathematics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1969. Since that time he has been on the faculty at the University of California at San Diego and is currently a Professor of Computer Science and director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. Program in Cognitive Science. Professor Savitch's research areas include complexity theory, formal language theory, computational linguistics, and the development of computer science education materials. In addition to writing numerous research articles and involvement in other editorial projects, he has written a number of well-known computer science textbooks, including Pascal, Ada, and C++ CS1 and CS2 textbooks.

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