Data Compression: The Complete Reference

Front Cover
Springer New York, Oct 12, 2000 - Computers - 821 pages
A comprehensive reference for the many different types and methods of compression, including a detailed and helpful taxonomy, an analysis of the most common methods, and discussions on their use and comparative benefits. The presentation is organized into the main branches of the field: run length encoding, statistical methods, dictionary-based methods, image compression, audio compression, and video compression. Detailed descriptions and explanations of the most well- known and frequently used methods are covered in a self-contained fashion, with an accessible style and technical level for specialists and nonspecialists. In short, the book provides an invaluable reference and guide for all computer scientists, computer engineers, electrical engineers, signal/image processing engineers and other scientists needing a comprehensive compilation for a broad range of compression methods.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This is a book review of, Data Compression: The Complete Reference.
I am reviewing, Data Compression: The Complete Reference, because pages of this book are about me.
If you read it, you can find my name printed in bold face, along with a statement that the author has studied my patented data compression work (see section 2.7.2, for editions subsequent to the second edition it is an online supplement to the book, see the section counting argument.).
So in this book, you can read the author’s writings about me. And in this review, I will tell you how he scored on that subject.
I am the inventor of the data compression method that this author makes unsubstantiated accusations about in section 2.7.2 from the first edition of this book.
I am also the inventor of the data compression method that this author analyzed (again section 2.7.2, for editions subsequent to the second edition it is an online supplement to the book, see the counting argument.)
I can state unequivocally that the author’s example is preposterous and absolutely ridiculous.
I contacted the publisher about this book, but they continued to support the author in his endeavor.
In my option the author’s score is F. Because he is either not an expert on the subject or he is unwilling to admit that he did not know what he was talking about at the time.
(c) Copyright 2013, All Rights Reserved.
 

Contents

Introduction
1
Basic Techniques
13
Statistical Methods
39
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

David Salomon is retired professor emeritus of computer science from California State University, Northridge. He is author of numerous articles and books, including Data Compression, Third Edition, Guide to Data Compression Methods, and Data Privacy and Security.

Bibliographic information