Data Model Patterns: Conventions of Thought

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Dorset House Pub., 1996 - Computers - 268 pages
Learning the basics of a modeling technique is not the same as learning how to use and apply it. To develop a data model of an organization is to gain insights into its nature that do not come easily. Indeed, analysts are often expected to understand subtleties of an organization's structure that may have evaded people who have worked there for years.

Here's help for those analysts who have learned the basics of data modeling (or "entity/relationship modeling") but who need to obtain the insights required to prepare a good model of a real business.

Structures common to many types of business are analyzed in areas such as accounting, material requirements planning, process manufacturing, contracts, laboratories, and documents.

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Contents

Data Modeling Conventions
10
A Data Model
11
A Randomly Arranged Data Model
17
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Hay has been developing interactive, database-oriented systems since the days of punched cards, paper tape, and teletype machines. He is president of Essential Strategies, Inc., a Houston, Texas-based world-wide consultancy that uses modeling techniques to help construct information strategies and architectures, and defines requirements in a wide range of organizations, including pharmaceutical researchers, news-gathering and broadcasting firms, oil refiners, and government agencies.

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