Daughters of America Or Women of the Century

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Sep 1, 2005 - History - 752 pages
To the women of future centuries of the United States of America, this record of many women of the first and second centuries, whose lives were full of usefulness, and therefore worthy of renown and imitation. - from the Dedication Initially released in 1883, DAUGHTERS OF AMERICA OR WOMEN OF THE CENTURY contains the first published attempt to record the life and times of hundreds of extraordinary women. This remarkable manual chronicles a vast array of women including insightful profiles of: Religious & Spiritual Women Women of the American Revolution The Wives of the Presidents Women Leaders in Philanthropy and Society Women Poets and Scientists Women Preachers and Educators Invaluable and entertaining, Hanaford's work here is an enduring example of the profound influence of women throughout Western culture. PHEBE A. HANAFORD (1829-1921) was born into a Quaker family on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts. She spoke openly of her desire to be a Quaker preacher and eventually took the pledge at age 18 as an ordained chaplain and treasurer of the Daughters of Temperance. However, her commitment as an abolitionist led her to relinquish her Quaker pacifism. As a result, her contact with women of the Universalist church opened up a world of activism for the rights of women.
 

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Contents

I
19
II
45
III
65
IV
129
V
151
VI
185
VII
214
VIII
249
XV
516
XVI
551
XVII
576
XVIII
601
XIX
617
XX
641
XXI
655
XXII
681

IX
270
X
291
XI
325
XII
351
XIII
435
XIV
497
XXIII
707
XXIV
717
XXV
720
XXVI
730
XXVII
735
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Page 71 - Tis well,' said she in the same voice. ' All is now over ; I shall soon follow him ; I have no more trials to pass through.
Page 44 - The foreign officers were amazed to behold one whom so many causes contributed to elevate, preserving the even tenor of her life, while such a blaze of glory shone upon her name and offspring. The European world furnished no examples of such magnanimity. Names of ancient lore were heard to escape from their lips ; and they observed that, " if such were the matrons of America, it was not wonderful the sons were illustrious.

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