Dave Darrin's Fourth Year at Annapolis

Front Cover
1st World Publishing, May 22, 2006 - Literary Collections - 216 pages
0 Reviews
Naval Academy, did not finish what he was about to say. While speaking he had closed the door behind him and had stepped into the quarters occupied jointly by himself and by Midshipman Daniel Dalzell, also of the first or upper class. "Danny boy isn't here. Visiting, probably," mused Dave Darrin, after having glanced into the alcove bedroom at his right hand. It was a Saturday night, early in October. The new academic year at the Naval Academy was but a week old. There being no "hop" that night the members of the brigade had their time to spend as they pleased. Some of the young men would need the time sadly to put in at their new studies. Dave, fortunately, did not feel under any necessity to spend his leisure in grinding over text-books.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

1 WANTED A DOUGHFACE
7
2 SOME ONE PUSHES THE TUNGSTEN
22
3 BAD NEWS FROM WEST POINT
33
4 DAVES WORK GOES STALE
43
5 DAN HANDS HIMSELF BAD MONEY
49
6 THE FORGOT PATH TO TROUBLE
56
7 DANS EYES JOLT HIS WITS
67
8 THE PRIZE TRIP ON THE DODGER
74
14 THE NAVY GOAT GRINS
120
15 DAN FEELS AS SOLD AS HE LOOKS
129
16 THE DAY OF MANY DOUBTS
139
17 MR CLAIRY DEALS IN OUTRAGES
147
18 THE WHOLE CLASS TAKES A HAND
155
19 MIDSHIPMAN DARRIN HAS THE FLOOR
162
20 DAN STEERS ON THE ROCKS AGAIN
170
21 IN THE THICK OF DISASTER
180

9 THE TREACHERY OF MORTON
86
10 WE BELONG TO THE NAVY TOO
93
11 A QUARTERS WORTH OF HOPE
100
12 READY TO TRIM WEST POINT
105
13 WHEN BRACE UP ARMY WAS THE WORD
115
22 THE SEARCH AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BAY
190
23 GRADUATION DAY AT LAST
196
24 CONCLUSION
203
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Harrie Irving Hancock (H. Irving Hancock) was born January 16, 1868 in Massachusetts. Hancock was a prolific writer, an American chemist, and a Jiu-Jitsu expert. He is mostly known for his juvenile "boys" series such as The Grammar School Boys/Dick & Co. Series, The High School Boys Series, The Young Engineer Series, and Uncle Sam's Boys Series, but was also well-known for his physical fitness writing which included several manuals on Jiu-Jitsu. Hancock was also a war correspondent, which lead to his historical fiction series on a German invasion of the United States. Hancock married Nellie Stein on December 21, 1887 and had two adopted daughters. Hancock died of liver illness in Blue Point, Suffolk County, New York on March 12, 1922.

Bibliographic information