David Copperfield

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The Floating Press, Jan 1, 2009 - Fiction - 1739 pages
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David Copperfield is considered to be Charles Dickens's most autobiographical novel. He said of it: "Like many fond parents, I have in my heart of hearts a favourite child. And his name is David Copperfield." It is a Bildungsroman, a tale which follows the development into maturity of its narrator, David Copperfield. The Russian greats Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky both greatly admired the novel, as did Kafka, Joyce and James. Freud called it his favourite novel.
 

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David Copperfield is the story of a young man’s adventures on his journey from an unhappy and impoverished childhood to the discovery of his vocation as a successful novelist. Among the gloriously ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter 33 Blissful
935
Chapter 34 My Aunt Astonishes Me
967
Chapter 35 Depression
985
Chapter 36 Enthusiasm
1025
Chapter 37 A Little Cold Water
1058
Chapter 38 A Dissolution of Partnership
1074
Chapter 39 Wickfield and Heep
1107
Chapter 40 The Wanderer
1146

Chapter 7 My First Half at Salem House
184
Chapter 8 My Holidays Especially One Happy Afternoon
219
Chapter 9 I Have a Memorable Birthday
250
Chapter 10 I Become Neglected and Am Provided For
274
Chapter 11 I Begin Life on My Own Account and Dont Like It
314
Chapter 12 Liking Life on My Own Account No Better I Form a Great Resolution
343
Chapter 13 The Sequel of My Resolution
362
Chapter 14 My Aunt Makes Up Her Mind About Me
401
Chapter 15 I Make Another Beginning
433
Chapter 16 I Am a New Boy in More Senses than One
452
Chapter 17 Somebody Turns Up
494
Chapter 18 A Retrospect
528
Chapter 19 I Look About Me and Make a Discovery
542
Chapter 20 Steerforths Home
575
Chapter 21 Little Emly
592
Chapter 22 Some Old Scenes and Some New People
631
Chapter 23 I Corroborate Mr Dick and Choose a Profession
676
Chapter 24 My First Dissipation
705
Chapter 25 Good and Bad Angels
722
Chapter 26 I Fall into Captivity
761
Chapter 27 Tommy Traddles
791
Chapter 28 Mr Micawbers Gauntlet
811
Chapter 29 I Visit Steerforth at His Home Again
850
Chapter 30 A Loss
865
Chapter 31 A Greater Loss
881
Chapter 32 The Beginning of a Long Journey
899
Chapter 41 Doras Aunts
1163
Chapter 42 Mischief
1196
Chapter 43 Another Retrospect
1236
Chapter 44 Our Housekeeping
1252
Chapter 45 Mr Dick Fulfils My Aunts Predictions
1282
Chapter 46 Intelligence
1313
Chapter 47 Martha
1341
Chapter 48 Domestic
1363
Chapter 49 I Am Involved in Mystery
1385
Chapter 50 Mr Peggottys Dream Comes True
1409
Chapter 51 The Beginning of a Longer Journey
1428
Chapter 52 I Assist at an Explosion
1462
Chapter 53 Another Retrospect
1509
Chapter 54 Mr Micawbers Transactions
1520
Chapter 55 Tempest
1551
Chapter 56 The New Wound and the Old
1574
Chapter 57 The Emigrants
1587
Chapter 58 Absence
1608
Chapter 59 Return
1620
Chapter 60 Agnes
1653
Chapter 61 I Am Shown Two Interesting Penitents
1672
Chapter 62 A Light Shines on My Way
1696
Chapter 63 A Visitor
1714
Chapter 64 A Last Retrospect
1730
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About the author (2009)

Charles Dickens, perhaps the best British novelist of the Victorian era, was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England on February 7, 1812. His happy early childhood was interrupted when his father was sent to debtors' prison, and young Dickens had to go to work in a factory at age twelve. Later, he took jobs as an office boy and journalist before publishing essays and stories in the 1830s. His first novel, The Pickwick Papers, made him a famous and popular author at the age of twenty-five. Subsequent works were published serially in periodicals and cemented his reputation as a master of colorful characterization, and as a harsh critic of social evils and corrupt institutions. His many books include Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Great Expectations, Little Dorrit, A Christmas Carol, and A Tale of Two Cities. Dickens married Catherine Hogarth in 1836, and the couple had nine children before separating in 1858 when he began a long affair with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. Despite the scandal, Dickens remained a public figure, appearing often to read his fiction. He died in 1870, leaving his final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished.

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