Days in Clover

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S. Low, Marston, 1892 - Fishing - 120 pages
 

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Page 24 - Indeed, my good scholar, we may say of angling as Dr. Boteler said of strawberries, " Doubtless God could have made a better berry, but doubtless God never did ; " and so, if I might be judge, " God never did make a more calm, quiet, innocent recreation than angling.
Page 26 - IF all the world and love were young, And truth in every shepherd's tongue, These pretty pleasures might me move To live with thee and be thy love.
Page 47 - And the poor beetle that we tread upon, In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies.
Page 24 - ... for Angling was, after tedious study, ' a rest to his mind, a cheerer of his spirits, a diverter of sadness, a calmer of unquiet thoughts, a moderator of passions, a procurer of contentedness ; and that it begat habits of peace and patience in those that professed and practised it.
Page 26 - I'll give you a syllabub of new verjuice, in a new-made haycock, for it. And my Maudlin shall sing you one of her best ballads ; for she and I both love all anglers, they be such honest, civil, quiet men. In the meantime will you drink a draught of red cow's milk ? you shall have it freely.
Page 6 - THERE is not in the wide world a valley so sweet, As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet; Oh ! the last rays of feeling and life must depart, Ere the bloom of that valley shall fade from my heart.
Page 25 - I'll be as certain to make him a good dish of meat, as I was to catch him. I'll now lead you to an honest Ale-house where we shall find a cleanly room, lavender in the windows, nnd twenty ballads stuck about the wall...
Page 26 - Her voice was good, and the ditty fitted for it; it was that smooth song which was made by Kit Marlow, now at least fifty years ago; and the milkmaid's mother sung an answer to it, which was made by Sir Walter Raleigh, in his younger days.
Page 67 - Ashiesteil — -days so lovely that they sometimes in the end begat a superstitious eeriness. One seemed forsaken in an enchanted world ; one might see the two white fairy deer flit by, bringing to us, as to Thomas the Rhymer, the tidings that we must back to Fairyland...

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