De Porquet's Italian phrases; or, Il fraseggiatore toscano: A copious choice of Italian sentences to facilitate a knowledge of the formation of the verbs and syntax of that elegant tongue ...

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S. Burdett & Company, 1832 - Italy - 120 pages
 

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Page 116 - Good morning, Sir, I am very glad to see you in good health. I thank you. How have you been since I had the pleasure of seeing you ? Extremely well, I thank you.
Page 114 - DIRECTIONS HOW TO USE THE DIFFERENT FORMS OF ADDRESSING PERSONS IN ITALIAN, AND FOR THE BETTER RE-WRITING THESE CONVERSATIONS. THE Italians, in speaking or writing to persons of both sexes whom either from rank or superiority of station, or from any other circumstance, they wish to treat with great respect, make use of the title vossignoria* or vostra signoria (your lordship, or ladyship), for which ella is substituted. This title being of the third person and feminine gender, it follows that the...
Page 120 - I as sure you. The second person plural is used, as in English, in familiar conversation, among friends and acquaintances, and sometimes even when addressing superiors and other persons of rank ; for the form of addressing in the third person is not generally used ; and in several parts of Italy it is even considered an affectation. Therefore the second person plural may almost always be used, and particularly by foreigners, who are not obliged to speak in the third person, whilst this form is not...
Page 116 - When you and yours relate to two or more persons, they are expressed by il loro, la loro, $c., instead of il vostro, la vostra, &jc. : as, — Signori, or Signore, le loro carrozza non ancora arrivata, e le Signorie loro possono servirsi della mia, se la loro non viene. Gentlemen, or ladies, your carriage is not yet arrived, and you may make use of mine, if yours does not come. The following dialogue, in the third person, is given as an example of the preceding rules. EXAMPLE I. La INSTEAD OP...
Page 118 - Maria, hai imparato tutte le tue lezioni ? Non tutte. Hai imparato un verbo ? Ne ho imparato due ; poich sono facilissimi. E hai scritto il tema italiano ? Non ancora. E tu hai scritto il tuo ? L...
Page 116 - ... or by di lei, il di lei, la di lei, $c., instead of il vostro, la vostra, <Sfc. : as, — Signorina, mi dia le sue penne, or le di lei penne. Miss, give me your pens. Signora, ella ha preso il mio libro, ed io ho preso il suo. Madam, you have taken my book, andI have taken yours.
Page 115 - ... CONVERSATIONS. THE Italians, in speaking or writing to persons of both sexes whom either from rank or superiority of station, or from any other circumstance, they wish to treat with great respect, make use of the title vossignoria,* or vostra signoria (your lordship, or ladyship), for which ella is substituted. This title being of the third person and feminine gender, it follows that the verb is to be put in the third person, and the adjective and participle must agree with it : as, — Ella...
Page 115 - You (Gentlemen.) Of You. To you. You. From you. You (Ladies.) Of you. To you. You. From you. You (Ladies, or Gentlemen.) Of you. To you. You. From You. The possessive pronouns your and yours, having reference to one person, are expressed by il suo, la sua, &c., or by di lei, il di lei, la di lei, &c., instead of il vostro, la vostra, &c.
Page 115 - ... ladyship), for which ella is substituted. This title being of the third person and feminine gender, it follows that the verb is to be put in the third person, and the adjective and participle must agree with it : as, — Ella mi disse che era soddisfatta, instead of Mi diceste che eravate soddisfatto, You told me that you were satisfied. The pronoun ella, which is now generally used instead of vossignoria, is made use of when speaking to one person, in the following manner : — N. Ella,t G....
Page 116 - I should see you there. Have you been well amused? Tolerably. How long have you been in London?' Buon d, Signore ; godo molto di vederla in buona salute. Grazie. Come ella stata da che non ho avuto il piacere di vederfc i Benissimo, la ringrazio.

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