De Rerum Natura

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Psychology Press, 2003 - Literary Collections - 210 pages
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The De Rurum Natura of Lucretius (99BC-55BC) is one of the great books of the world, a lucid explanation of physical phenomena that develops into a majestic vision of the ultimate nature of the universe.
Lucretius' observations of the particularities of the world remain alive across the centuries. We follow his enquiring, scientific mind as he investigates the workings of mirror images, thunderstorms and magnetism, how we walk and what sleep is. Overarching all is Lucretius' belief in a universe of eternally recurring elements.
 

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This is a stunningly prescient work about how the natural world and the universe operate. The language is rich and evocative. An appreciation of the beauty in the world that surrounds us is mixed with a rigorous investigation through narrative analysis of the underlying, invisible atomic fabric of existence. It is one of the great books of all time and belongs on the shelf of every serious thinking man and woman.
Joel Levinson - Founder of SpaceGroup and author of The Reluctant Hunter
 

Selected pages

Contents

INTRODUCTION
7
BOOK I
15
BOOK II
44
BOOK III
76
BOOK IV
105
BOOK V
138
BOOK VI
177
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About the author (2003)

Titus Lucretius Carus Lucretius was a Roman poet and philosopher (ca. 99 BC ca. 55 BC). His only known work is an epic philosophical poem laying out the beliefs of Epicureanism, De rerum natura, translated into English as On the Nature of Things.

Edgar Allan Poe was a poet, short-story writer, editor, critic, and one of the leaders of the American Romantics. C. H. Sisson was a poet, novelist, essayist, and polemicist.

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