Dear Sisters: Dispatches From The Women's Liberation Movement

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Basic Books, May 17, 2001 - Social Science - 336 pages
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Today's women are so comfortable in their authority that they often forget to credit the women's liberation movement of the 1960s and '70s for paving the way--from the kitchen to the boardroom, from sexual harassment to self-defense, from cheerleading on the sidelines to playing center on the team. Distinguished scholars and active participants in the movement, Linda Gordon and Rosalyn Baxandall have collected a colorful array of documents--songs, leaflets, cartoons, position papers--that illustrate the range of people, places, organizations, and ideas that made up the movement. Dear Sisters chronicles historical change in such broad areas as health, work, and family, and captures the subtle humor, unceasing passion, and overwhelming diversity that defined the women's liberation movement.
 

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Contents

I
19
II
21
III
41
IV
67
V
84
VI
115
VII
117
VIII
134
IX
155
X
175
XI
211
XII
213
XIII
237
XIV
254
XV
282
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Rosalyn Fraad Baxandall was born in Manhattan, New York on June 12, 1939. She received a bachelor's degree in French from the University of Wisconsin in 1961 and a master's degree from the School of Social Work at Columbia University in 1963. She began working for the Mobilization for Youth and took part in the women's movement. She picketed the 1968 Miss America pageant in Atlantic City and had a prominent role in the abortion speakout in the West Village in 1969. In 1971, she began teaching in the American studies department at the State University of New York at Old Westbury. She later served as head of the department. After retiring from SUNY in 2012, she taught in the labor studies program of the City University of New York and at the Bayview Correctional Facility. She along with Linda Gordon and Susan Reverby assembled primary documents that offered a sweeping history of women and labor. Their book, America's Working Women: A Documentary History, 1600 to the Present, was published in 1976. Her other books include Technology, the Labor Process and the Working Class: A Collection of Essays, Words on Fire: The Life and Writing of Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, Dear Sisters: Dispatches from the Women's Liberation Movement, and Picture Windows: How the Suburbs Happened written with Elizabeth Ewen. She died from kidney cancer on October 13, 2015 at the age of 76.

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