Death Comes for the Archbishop

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Aug 24, 2011 - Fiction - 304 pages
54 Reviews
Willa Cather's best known novel is an epic--almost mythic--story of a single human life lived simply in the silence of the southwestern desert. In 1851 Father Jean Marie Latour comes to serve as the Apostolic Vicar to New Mexico. What he finds is a vast territory of red hills and tortuous arroyos, American by law but Mexican and Indian in custom and belief. In the almost forty years that follow, Latour spreads his faith in the only way he knows--gently, all the while contending with an unforgiving landscape, derelict and sometimes openly rebellious priests, and his own loneliness. Out of these events, Cather gives us an indelible vision of life unfolding in a place where time itself seems suspended.

BONUS: The edition includes an excerpt from The Selected Letters of Willa Cather. 
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - BookConcierge - LibraryThing

Okay … Intellectually I can appreciate Cather’s writing. The last chapter, in particular, is very fine. I love the way she is able to convey a sense of time and place … and she speaks of a landscape ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Daniel.Estes - LibraryThing

The story of Bishop Jean Marie Latour is for anyone who's adventured to a foreign land and then stayed long enough to call it home. To fully appreciate Willa Cather's Death Comes for the Archbishop, a ... Read full review

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Contents

I
1
II
15
III
17
IV
25
V
32
VI
42
VII
51
VIII
53
XXII
175
XXIII
186
XXIV
197
XXVI
199
XXVII
210
XXVIII
219
XXIX
230
XXX
235

IX
63
X
79
XI
81
XII
88
XIII
94
XIV
103
XV
115
XVI
117
XVII
124
XVIII
137
XIX
139
XX
158
XXI
173
XXXII
237
XXXIII
243
XXXIV
248
XXXV
261
XXXVII
263
XXXVIII
266
XXXIX
271
XL
274
XLI
281
XLII
287
XLIII
290
XLIV
296
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About the author (2011)

Willa Cather was probably born in Virginia in 1873, although her parents did not register the date, and it is probably incorrectly given on her tombstone. Because she is so famous for her Nebraska novels, many people assume she was born there, but Willa Cather was about nine years old when her family moved to a small Nebraska frontier town called Red Cloud that was populated by immigrant Swedes, Bohemians, Germans, Poles, Czechs, and Russians. The oldest of seven children, she was educated at home, studied Latin with a neighbor, and read the English classics in the evening. By the time she went to the University of Nebraska in 1891–where she began by wearing boy’s clothes and cut her hair close to her head–she had decided to be a writer.

After graduation she worked for a Lincoln, Nebraska, newspaper, then moved to Pittsburgh and finally to New York City. There she joined McClure’s magazine, a popular muckraking periodical that encouraged the writing of new young authors. After meeting the author Sarah Orne Jewett, she decided to quit journalism and devote herself full time to fiction. Her first novel, Alexander’s Bridge, appeared in serial form in McClure’ s in 1912. But her place in American literature was established with her first Nebraska novel, O Pioneers!, published in 1913, which was followed by her most famous pioneer novel, My Antonia, in 1918. In 1922 she won the Pulitzer Prize for one of her lesser-known books, One of Ours. Death Comes for the Archbishop (1927), her masterpiece, and Shadows on the Rock (1931) also celebrated the pioneer spirit, but in the Southwest and French Canada. Her other novels include The Song of the Lark(1915), The Professor’ s House (1925), My Mortal Enemy (1926), and Lucy Gayheart (1935). Willa Cather died in 1947.


From the Hardcover edition.

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