Death, Dying and Bereavement: A Hong Kong Chinese Experience, Volume 1

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Cecilia Lai Wan Chan, Amy Yin Man Chow
Hong Kong University Press, Jan 1, 2006 - Social Science - 384 pages
Fear marks the boundary between the known and the unknown. Some Chinese people believe that talking about death will increase the likelihood of occurrence. Also, by talking about death, evil spirits will be attracted to haunt people. In facing death, individual response is inevitably moulded by the values, attitudes, and beliefs of one's culture. Despite the large Chinese emigrant population in major cities in the world, available material in English on death, dying and bereavement among Chinese people is scarce. As Hong Kong is a place where East meets West, most professionals working in the field of death, dying and bereavement adapt knowledge from the West to their practice with the Chinese population. The intention of this volume is to consolidate and disseminate valuable practical wisdom with professionals in the local and international communities who serve Chinese patients and their family members. Both Editors are from the Department of Social Work and Social Administration, University of Hong Kong. Professor Cecilia Lai Wan Chan has done extensive research in psychosocial oncology, behavioral health, grief, loss and bereavement. Amy Yin Man Chow, an Honorary Clinical Associate in the department, is a registered social worker specialized in bereavement counselling.
 

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Comprehensive in many aspects: religions, professions and perspectives of patients, doctors, researchers and scholars. Highly recommended

Contents

Introduction
1
Recollections of Observations
15
The Physician the Researcher
31
Grieving and
65
A Reflection
87
Knowing the Unknown
93
A Forensic Pathologists View
105
Death Metaphors in Chinese
117
Community Palliative Care in Hong Kong
183
The Role of Chinese Medicine in Cancer Palliative Care
195
Enhancing Effectiveness
209
Care for Chinese Families with Patients Facing Impending
225
The Loss and Grief of Parents
241
Past Present
253
The Use of Structured Therapeutic Bereavement Groups
273
The Suicide Bereavement Experience
293

Bridging the Gap between
127
Impact of Palliative Medicine on the Quality of Life
139
The Last Month
151
Euthanasia and Forgoing Lifesustaining Treatment
169
Conclusion
309
Index
349
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About the author (2006)

Both Editors are from the Department of Social Work and Social Administration, University of Hong Kong. Professor Cecilia Lai Wan Chan has done extensive research in psychosocial oncology, behavioral health, grief, loss and bereavement.

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