Death Penalty USA, 2001-2002

Front Cover
MoBeta Publishing, Jan 1, 2009 - Law - 449 pages
0 Reviews
The taking of a human life is in all circumstances reprehensible and must be punished within the confines of U.S. law.The basic concept underlying the Eighth Amendment is nothing less than the dignity of man. While the State has the power to punish, the Amendment stands to assure that this power be exercised within the limits of civilized standards. (Trop v. Dulles (1958) 356 U.S. 86, 100) This is the third book in a series of books providing a brief history of 21st century capital-punishment executions in the United States. Each volume in the series begins with an overview of capital punishment in the United States and follows with the case histories of two consecutive years of U.S. executions.These books are not intended to be easy reading. The crimes for which the death penalty was imposed are truly horrific and described in graphic detail based on public record. Compilations are taken from and referenced to case citations. Original names and places are retained. Some cases are necessarily more comprehensive than others. High profile murders and those involving multiple victims, difficult conviction, and vigorous defenses have more extensive records than capital crimes involving the murder of a homeless person or a clerk during a convenience store robbery. Cases where the conviction is based on circumstantial evidence tend to be more detailed than those based on voluntary confessions as do cases that take advantage of the appellate process.Each case history is written in a nonsensationalized way that is respectful of all those touched by death. The crimes are written such that each is self-contained and can be read either sequentially or randomly. Supplemental information such as a condemned prisoner's last meal and last words are added when such material is insightful, and the prosecution and the disposition of accomplices is included when known. The names of the executed prisoners are indexed chronologically in the Table of Contents. A reference list and an Index are provided.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

U S Law and the Death Penalty
1
Michelangelo Delfino and Mary E
2
References
20
Robert Dewey Glock II
27
Alvin Urial Goodwin III
35
Mark Andrew Fowler
42
Loyd Winford LaFevers
54
Adolfo Gil Hernandez
60
Byron Ashley Parker
216
Stephen Wayne Anderson
230
Michael Owsley
246
Gerald Wayne Tigner Jr
259
Paul W Kreutzer
272
Rodolfo Baiza Hernandez
291
Johnny Joe Martinez
305
Walter Mickens Jr
312

Robert William Clayton
67
Willie Ervin Fisher
71
Tomas Grant Ervin
84
David Lee Goff
98
Terrance Anthony James
111
Wheat
129
James Lowery
144
Clifton Allen White
157
Michael S Roberts
173
Gerald Lee Mitchell
186
Fred Marion Gilreath Jr
199
Randall Eugene Cannon
325
Javier Suarez Medina
338
Anthony Green
353
Rex Warren Mays
366
William Howard Putman
386
Craig Neil Ogan Jr
393
Ernest West Basden
407
Jessie Derrell Williams
421
General References
436
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Michelangelo Delfino and Mary E. Day gained worldwide attention when their investigative reporting caused five F.B.I. agents to storm Agilent Technologies, Inc. in Loveland, Colorado in pursuit of a high-level Agilent employee sending death threats to families in California. In a criminal case that highlighted the vulnerability of corporate America to domestic terrorism, the two muckrakers testified on behalf of the federal government, the Agilent terrorist was prosecuted, and none of his threats were carried out. Death Penalty USA: 2001 - 2002 is Delfino and Day's third book in a highly acclaimed series of capital crime and punishment books. Devoting themselves to public issues, they are the authors of the best-selling book on SLAPP (Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation) and a medical/health book that warns of the dangers of using radiation to diagnose and treat cancer.

Bibliographic information