Death and Burial in the Roman World

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JHU Press, Oct 31, 1996 - History - 336 pages
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Never before available in paperback, J. M. C. Toynbee's study is the most comprehensive book on Roman burial practices. Ranging throughout the Roman world from Rome to Pompeii, Britain to Jerusalem—Toynbee's book examines funeral practices from a wide variety of perspectives. First, Toynbee examines Roman beliefs about death and the afterlife, revealing that few Romans believed in the Elysian Fields of poetic invention. She then describes the rituals associated with burial and mourning: commemorative meals at the gravesite were common, with some tombs having built-in kitchens and rooms where family could stay overnight. Toynbee also includes descriptions of the layout and finances of cemeteries, the tomb types of both the rich and poor, and the types of grave markers and monuments as well as tomb furnishings.

 

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Contents

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
7
ROMAN BELIEFS ABOUT THE AFTERLIFE CREMATION
33
FUNERARY RITES AND THE CULT OF THE DEAD
43
THE LAYOUT OF CEMETERIES AND OWNERSHIP OF TOMBS WALLED
73
SELECTED TYPES OF TOMBS I
101
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About the author (1996)

J. M. C. Toynbee was Lawrence Professor of Classical Archaeology at Cambridge University and an honorary Fellow of Newnham College. Before her death in 1985, she served as a Fellow of the British Academy and the Royal Numismatic Society, and as a member of the faculty of the British School in Rome. She authored numerous articles and books, including Art in Roman Britain, The Art of the Romans, Roman Historical Portraits, and Roman Life and Art in Britain.

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