Death No Bane: A New Translation, with Copious Illustrative Notes, of Cicero's First Tusculan Disputation

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S. Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington, 1889 - Immortality - 171 pages
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Page 150 - What would not a man give if he might converse with Orpheus and Musaeus and Hesiod and Homer? Nay, if this be true, let me die again and again.
Page 149 - Let us reflect in another way, and we shall see that there is great reason to hope that death is a good, for one of two things: either death is a state of nothingness and utter unconsciousness, or as men -say, there is a change and migration of the soul from this world to another.
Page 150 - I say that to die is gain; for eternity is then only a single night. But if death is .the journey to another place, and there, as men say, all the dead abide, what good, O my friends and judges, can be greater than this?
Page 151 - Wherefore, O judges, be of good cheer about death, and know this of a truth — that no evil can happen to a good man, either in life or after death. He and his are not neglected by the gods; nor has my own approaching end happened by mere chance. But I see clearly that to die and be released was better for me ; and therefore the oracle gave no sign.
Page 151 - I and my sons will have received justice at your hands. The hour of departure has arrived, and we go our ways — I to die, and you to live. Which is better, God only knows.
Page 149 - ... dreams, death will be an unspeakable gain. For if a person were to select the night in which his sleep was undisturbed even by dreams, and were to compare with this the other days and nights of his life, and then were to tell us how many days and nights he had passed in the course of his life better and more pleasantly than this one, I think that any man, I will not say a private man, but even the great king, will not find many such days or nights, when compared with the others. Now if death...
Page 152 - Yet if, as holiest men have deem'd, there be A land of souls beyond that sable shore, To shame the doctrine of the Sadducee And sophists, madly vain of dubious lore ; How sweet it were in concert to adore With those who made our mortal labours light ! To hear each voice we fear'd to hear no more ! Behold each mighty shade reveal'd to sight, The Bactrian, Samian sage, and all who taught the right ! IX.
Page 150 - I say that to die is gain ; for eternity is then only a single night. But if death is the journey to another place, and there, as men say, all the ; dead are, what good, O my friends
Page 149 - ... either death is a state of nothingness and utter unconsciousness, or, as men say, there is a change and migration of the soul from this world to another. Now if you suppose that there is no consciousness, but a sleep like the sleep of him who is undisturbed even by dreams, death will be an unspeakable gain.
Page 150 - What would not a man give, O judges, to be able to examine the leader of the great Trojan expedition ; or Odysseus or Sisyphus, or numberless others, men and women too ! What infinite delight would there be in conversing...

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