Debates in ESOL Teaching and Learning: Culture, Communities and Classrooms

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Psychology Press, 2005 - Education - 164 pages
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This unique book provides a lively introduction to the theory and research surrounding the adult learning of English for Speakers of Other Languages. Offering a digest and discussion of current debates, the book examines a wide geographical and social spread of issues, such as:

* how to understand the universal characteristics of learning an additional language
* what makes a 'good' language learner
* multilingualism and assumptions about monolingualism
* learning the written language
* the effect of recent Government immigration policy on language learning processes.

As a majority of adults learning ESOL are from communities of immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers, understanding the diversity of social and personal history of learners is a critical dimension of this book. It also recognises the social pressures and tensions on the learners away from the classroom and discusses various types of classroom and language teaching methodologies.

Full of practical activities and case studies, this book is essential reading for any basic skills teacher undertaking a course of professional development, from GNVQ through to post-graduate level.

 

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Contents

Learning an additional language Looking for universal characteristics
5
Nabei T and Swain M 2002 Learner awareness of recasts in classroom interaction
14
Breen M P 2001 The social context for language learning a neglected situation?
22
Discussion
38
Research
39
The good language learner Changing definitions?
40
Norton B and Toohey K 2001 Changing perspectives on good language learners
42
Chamot A 2001 The role of learning strategies in second language acquisition
55
Additional reading
95
Learning the written language Cultures communities and classrooms
96
Kern R 2000 Linguistic resources
98
BellJ S 1995 The relationship between L1 and L2 literacy
104
Auerbach E 1996 From the Community to the Community
118
Discussion
126
Research
127
Learning the spoken language From ideal to asymmetrical interaction
128

Discussion
64
Discussion
65
Additional reading
66
From mono to multilingualism Language use across settings and identities
67
Saxena M 1994 Literacies among the Panjabis in Southall Britain
69
Crystal D 2001 The future of Englishes
75
McLaughlin J 1986 Developing writing in English from mothertongue storytelling
84
Discussion
94
Carter R 1998 Orders of reality
129
Bremer K et al 1996 Case studies
144
Discussion
159
Research
160
References
161
Index
165
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About the author (2005)

Kathy Pitt is an honorary Research Fellow at the Literacy Research Centre in the Institute of Advanced Studies, Lancaster University. She entered the academic world after many years of travel and different types of work, and completed her doctoral thesis in the Linguistics department of Lancaster University in 2001. She teaches on postgraduate programmes for both Lancaster and the Open University.

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