Debating the Past: Music, Memory, and Identity in the Andes

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Oxford University Press, Jul 19, 2001 - Music - 208 pages
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This volume examines how the search for "cultural authenticity," the dispute over the past, and the role of "modernity" have been instrumental in building the regional musical culture of the Mantaro Valley, a central Peruvian region with about half a million inhabitants. How these people have addressed concerns over the loss of ancient traditions by restructuring colonial and pre-Hispanic traditions into new contexts and forms is explored. Covering private and public music making, along with ritual, ceremonial, and popular uses of music, Romero studies the interaction of music and identity. The book is concerned with a modern regional culture, situated and defined in the context of an emergent nation, which is struggling to build a distinct cultural identity and to recreate values.
 

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Contents

REGION CULTURE AND IDENTITIES
13
PERPETUATING THE RURAL PAST
35
AUTHENTICITY AND MUSICAL ENSEMBLES
67
CONQUERING NEW SPACES
91
OFFICIAL POPULAR AND MUSICAL MEMORIES
123
Appendix
149
Notes
151
Glossary
169
Bibliography
173
Index
185
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Page 21 - Traditions which appear or claim to be old are often quite recent in origin and sometimes invented.
Page 7 - ... people whose national or cultural identity is mixed by virtue of migration, overseas education, or parentage.
Page 7 - native" anthropologists and "real" anthropologists stems from the colonial setting in which the discipline of anthropology was forged: the days in which natives were genuine natives (whether they liked it or not) and the observer's objectivity in the scientific study of Other societies posed no problem. To achieve access to the native's point of view (note the singular form), an anthropologist used the method of participant-observation among a variety of representative natives, often singling out...

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