Debit and Credit

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Harper, 1863 - 564 pages
 

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Page 230 - ONCE the baron's lands had borne better crops than those of his neighbors, his herds were acknowledged to be thoroughly healthy, bad years, which crushed others, had passed comparatively lightly over him. Now, all this was reversed as by some evil spell. A contagious disease broke out among the cattle ; the wheat grew tall indeed, but when it came to be threshed the grain was light. Everywhere the outgoings exceeded the incomings. Once upon a time he could have borne this calmly, now it made him...
Page viii - A poetic representation of a course of events consistent with the highest laws of moral government, whether it delineate the general history of a people [the Iliad as type], or narrate the fortunes of a chosen hero [the Odyssey as type].
Page 527 - The murderer stood for a few moments motionless in the darkness, leaning against the staircase railings. Then he slowly went up the steps. While doing so he felt his trousers to see how high they were wet. He thought to himself that he must dry them at the stove this very night, and saw in fancy the fire in the stove, and himself sitting before it in his dressing-gown, as he was accustomed to do when thinking over his business. If he had ever in his life known comfortable repose, it had been when,...
Page 234 - I myself am only too deeply involved in them," and he pointed to the place occupied in most men by a heart. " Had I known that your factory would devour my good money, one thousand after another, even as the lean kine of Egypt devoured the fat, I should have taken more time to consider, and would...
Page ix - The excellence of a romance," writes Chevalier Bunsen in his critical preface to Gustav Freytag's " Debit and Credit," " like that of an epic or a drama, lies in the apprehension and truthful exhibition of the course of human things ... a faithful mirror of the present.
Page xxii - Christian bearing of this united body toward the working classes, especially in towns. "3. The recognition of the mighty fact that the educated middle classes of all nations, but especially of those of Germany, are perfectly aware that even the present, but still more the near future, is their own, if they advance along the legal path to a perfect constitutional monarchy, resisting all temptations to the right hand or to the left, not with imbittered feelings, but in the cheerful temper of a moral...
Page 233 - ... first read the fatal tidings. During the journey he sat silently in a corner of the carriage. Arrived in town, he took his daughter to his lodgings, which he had not yet given up, for fear of leading his wife or his acquaintance to suspect that his means were impaired. He himself drove to Ehrenthal's. He entered the office in angry mood, and, after a dry salutation, held out the newspaper to the trader. Ehrenthal rose slowly, and said, nodding his head, " I know it ; Lowenberg has written to...
Page 239 - The baron started on hearing the name of Itzig. That was the man of whom he had been warned — the invisible, the merciless. " I was till now bookkeeper at Ehrenthal's," modestly continued Itzig ; " but Ehrenthal was too haughty for me. I have come into a small sum of money, and I have invested it in Mr. Pinkus' business. I am on the point of establishing myself.
Page 230 - ... acknowledged to be thoroughly healthy, bad years, which crushed others, had passed comparatively lightly over him. Now, all this was reversed as by some evil spell. A contagious disease broke out among the cattle ; the wheat grew tall indeed, but when it came to be threshed the grain was light. Everywhere the outgoings exceeded the incomings. Once upon a time he could have borne this calmly, now it made him positively ill. He began to hate the sight of his farm, and left it entirely to the bailiff....
Page 530 - ... assembly, he will take an interest in anything, will laugh and talk more than heretofore ; but his eyes will roam recklessly around, and he will be in constant dread of hearing something said of the murdered man, something said about his sudden end. And when, late of an evening, he at length returns home, tired to death and worn out by his fearful struggle, he feels lighter hearted, for he has succeeded in obscuring the truth, he is conscious of a melancholy pleasure in his weariness, and awaits...

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