Declaration of War: A Survey of the Position of Belligerents and Neutrals with Relative Considerations of Shipping and Marine Insurance During War

Front Cover
Stevens and sons, limited, 1889 - Marine insurance - 488 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 368 - A neutral Government is bound— " First. To use due diligence to prevent the fitting out, arming, or equipping within its jurisdiction of any vessel which it has reasonable ground to believe is intended to cruise or carry on war against a Power with which it is at peace...
Page 70 - ... arrests, restraints, and detainments of all kings, princes, and people, of what nation, condition, or quality soever, barratry of the master and mariners, and of all other perils, losses, and misfortunes, that have or shall come to the hurt, detriment, or damage of the said goods and merchandises, and ship, &c, or any part thereof.
Page 183 - Majesty shall judge capable of being converted into, or made useful in increasing the quantity of, military or naval stores...
Page 214 - That the penalty for the violent contravention of this right is the confiscation of the property so withheld from visitation and search. For the proof of this I need only refer to Vattel, one of the most correct and certainly not the least indulgent of modern professors of public law.
Page 108 - The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war; 3. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective — that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Page 239 - The truth may not always be discernible, but when it is discovered, it is according to the truth and not according to the fiction that we are to give to the transaction its character and denomination. If the voyage from the place of lading be not really ended, it matters not by what acts the party may have evinced his desire of making it appear to have ended.
Page 70 - Touching the adventures and perils which we the assurers are contented to bear and do take upon us in this voyage: they are of the seas, men of war, fire, enemies, pirates, rovers, thieves, jettisons, letters of mart and countermart, surprisals, takings at sea, arrests, restraints, and detainments of all kings, princes, and people, of what nation, condition, or quality soever...
Page 271 - State shall and may, during and notwithstanding the present hostilities with Russia, freely trade with all ports and places wheresoever situate, which shall not be in a state of blockade, save and except that no British vessel shall under any circumstances whatsoever, either under or by virtue of this Order, or otherwise, be permitted or empowered to enter or communicate with any port or place which shall belong to or be in the possession or occupation of Her Majesty's enemies.
Page 81 - Warranted free from capture and seizure and the consequences of any attempt thereat.
Page 357 - Court has long been established, that such illegal augmentation is a violation of the Law of Nations, as well as of our own Municipal Laws, and as a violation of our Neutrality, by analogy to other cases, it infects the captures subsequently made with the character of torts, and justifies and requires a restitution to the parties who have been injured by the misconduct. It does not lie in the mouth of wrong-doers to set up a title derived from a violation of our Neutrality.

Bibliographic information