Deco & Streamline Architecture in L.A.: A Moderne City Survey

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Schiffer Pub., 2004 - Architecture - 240 pages
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Dramatic photos and fascinating text explore the rich angular ornament, towers, graphics, and exaggerated works created by architects and designers in 1920s to 1940s Los Angeles. Students and admirers of the Art Deco and Streamline styles will delight in the remarkable array of public buildings, office towers, theaters, restaurants, religious structures, apartments, hotels, and individual homes. Many of the leading architects of the era are featured, including Claude Beelman; Morgan, Walls & Clements; A.C. Martin; Walker & Eisen: and John & Donald B. Parkinson. Celebrating populist, progressive, machine-age Los Angeles, this wonderful book showcases the two main categories of Art Deco styles: the zigzag, perpendicular Deco style of the 1920s and the aerodynamic, cubist style of the Streamline 1930s and early '40s. Allied to these are the many L.A. works known as PWA and Classical Moderne, as well as the playful Regency Moderne. With both exterior and interior views, this is an essential reference and a stunning tribute to architectural expression in Los Angeles.

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Contents

The Fine Line Between Modern
40
Moderne Structuring of Architecture
53
Furnishings and Art For The Moderne Style
59
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Elizabeth McMillian is a writer and an art and architectural historian. She is a former landmarks commissioner in Santa Monica, and former president of the Southern California Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians. She holds a Ph.D. in art history from the University of Southern California and was architectural editor at Architectural Digest from 1982 to 1992. She also wrote California Colonial for Schiffer Publishing (2002).

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