Decompiling Java

Front Cover
Apress, Jul 30, 2004 - Computers - 280 pages

Both Java and .NET use the idea of a "virtual machine," or VM. And while VMs are useful for some purposes, they undermine the security of your source code, because creation can be reversed, or decompiled. Which makes this one-of-a-kind book extremely useful: you must understand decompilation, to properly protect your intellectual property.

For example, how secure is your code after you run an obfuscator? The book will answer questions like this, and provide more thorough information about Java byte codes and the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) than any other book on the market. This book redresses the imbalance by providing insights into the features and limitations of today's decompilers and obfuscators, and offering a detailed look at what JVMs actually do.

Table of Contents Introduction Ghost in the Machine Tools of the Trade Protecting Your Source: Strategies for Defeating Decompilers Decompiler Design Decompiler Implementation Case Studies
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Ghost in the Machine
17
Tools of the Trade
61
Strategies for Defeating Decompilers
79
Decompiler Design
121
Decompiler Implementation
159
Case Studies
237
Classfile Grammar
247
Index
255
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Godfrey Nolan is president of RIIS LLC, where he specializes in website optimization. He has written numerous articles for magazines and newspapers in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Ireland. Nolan has had a healthy obsession with reverse engineering bytecode since he wrote Decompile Once, Run Anywhere, which first appeared in Web Techniques in September 1997.

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