Deep-Sea Fishes

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Academic Press, Oct 1, 1997 - Science - 388 pages
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The deep ocean is home to some of the most unusual of all fishes. This book is the first Fish Physiology volume devoted to these bizarre undersea creatures. Practically every organ system is affected by the constraints imposed by benthic pressure, the absence of light, and the relatively scarce supply of both food and mates. Deep Sea Fishes demonstrates how these fishes living in extremely harsh conditions metabolize, behave, and evolve.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 What Is the Deep Sea?
1
Chapter 2 Systematics of Deepsea Fishes
43
Chapter 3 Distribution and Population Ecology
79
Chapter 4 Feeding at Depth
115
Chapter 5 Buoyancy at Depth
195
Chapter 6 Biochemistry at Depth
239
Chapter 7 Pressure Effects on ShallowWater Fishes
279
Chapter 8 Sensory Physiology
325
Chapter 9 Laboratory and in Situ Methods for Studying Deepsea Fishes
351
Index
379
Other Volumes in the Fish Physoilogy Series
387
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About the author (1997)

Tony Farrell is a graduate of Bath University, where he was fortunate to study with Peter Lutz. His fortunes grew further when he moved in 1974 to Canada and the Zoology Department at the University of British Columbia to complete his Ph.D. degree under the superb tutelage of Dave Randall. In 2004, Tony returned to UBC when he accepted an endowed research chair in Sustainable Aquaculture.

In between these positions at UBC, Tony was employed at the University of Southern California (PDF), the University of New Brunswick (sessional lecturer), Mount Allison University (first real job) and Simon Fraser University (moving through the ranks to a full professor). In addition to highly controlled laboratory experiments on fish cardiorespiratory physiology, Tony is committed to working on animals in their own environment. Therefore, his research on fish physiology has taken him on an Alpha Helix expedition to the Amazon, the University of Gothenburg and the Kristineberg Marine Research Station in Sweden, the Portobello Marine Biological Station in New Zealand, the University of Christchurch and Massey University in New Zealand, the Bamfield Marine Science Station and the Huntsman Marine Station in Canada, the University of Aarhus in Denmark, the University of Adelaide Charles and Darwin University in Australia, and to the Danish Arctic Marine Station on Disco Island in Greenland. These travels have allowed him to work and with many superb collaborators word-wide, as well as study the physiology of over 70 different species of fish. Tony has received a number of awards for his scientific contributions: an honorary degree from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden; Awards of Excellence from the American Fisheries Society for Fish Physiology, Conservation and Management; the Fry Medal from the Canadian Society of Zoologists; and the Beverton Medal from the Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

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