Deep-Space Probes

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Springer Science & Business Media, Oct 31, 2000 - Science - 184 pages
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This excellent book by Dr Gregory Matloff could be viewed as a large multi disciplinary compendium of past research, current investigations and future research in astronautics. However, unlike conventional works that are usually closed, this book is an open guide in three main respects: it contains progressive exercises as the chapter and section topics evolve, it provides the reader with many updated references, and it clearly indicates projected research areas that could become current research in the near future. For a student, the included exercises could be transformed into small worksheets or notebooks featuring many modern symbolic or algebraic computation systems that run on desktop or laptop computers. Thus, rapid and progressive study is possible - a sort of learning library driven by the author and by the bibliography at the end of each chapter. More than 340 references for both professionals and students have been selected to provide the reader with a sound basis for expanding his or her knowledge of the many different subjects dealt with authoritatively by the author, who for several decades has worked actively in various fields of astronautics. A systematic and unhurried study of this book will produce for the reader an extraordinarily enlarged number-based view of spaceflight and its significant impact on our future global society.
 

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Contents

Motivations for deepspace travel
1
11 AN INVENTORY OF NEAREARTH OBJECTS
4
12 CONSIDERING NEO ORIGINS
6
13 THE DIFFICULTY OF TELESCOPIC EXPLORATION OF NEOS NEAR THEIR POINT OF ORIGIN
7
14 ROBOTIC EXPLORATION OPTIONS
9
16 BIBLIOGRAPHY
10
The realms of space
13
22 REALMS OF FIRE WATER AND ICE
15
73 THRUSTLESS TURNING
90
74 PERFORATED LIGHT SAIL OPTICAL THEORY
92
A METHOD OF IMPROVING LASERBEAM COLLIMATION
94
76 ROUNDTRIP INTERSTELLAR VOYAGES USING BEAMEDLASER PROPULSION
96
77 INTERSTELLAR PARTICLEBEAM PROPULSION
97
78 BIBLIOGRAPHY
98
On the technological horizon
101
82 THE RAMAUGMENTED INTERSTELLAR ROCKET RAIR
104

23 SOLAR RADIANT FLUX AND PLANET EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURE
16
24 THE EFFECT OF ATMOSPHERIC OPTICAL DEPTH
18
AN APPRECIATION OF THE LIFEZONE
20
THE REEFS OF SPACE
21
28 BIBLIOGRAPHY
22
Tomorrows targets
25
AN EARLY NASAJPL EXTRASOLAR MISSION STUDY
26
PROPOSED PROBES TO THE SUNS GRAVITY FOCUS
27
A SAIL TO THE HELIOPAUSE
29
34 THE NASA INTERSTELLAR INITIATIVE
30
36 THE NASA KUIPER BELT EXPLORER
31
37 A PROBE TO THE OORT CLOUD
32
38 BIBLIOGRAPHY
33
Space propulsion today
35
42 THE SOLARELECTRIC DRIVE
39
43 UNPOWERED PLANETARY GRAVITY ASSISTS
40
44 POWERED SOLAR GRAVITY ASSISTS
44
45 THE SOLARPHOTON SAIL
46
46 BIBLIOGRAPHY
54
The incredible shrinking spaceprobe
57
51 THE SMALL AND THE VERY SMALL
58
THE ART AND SCIENCE OF THE VERY VERY SMALL
59
NEARTERM POSSIBILITIES
61
LONGTERM POSSIBILITIES
62
55 POSSIBLE LIMITS TO NANOTECHNOLOGY
63
56 BIBLIOGRAPHY
64
The nuclear option
65
62 NUCLEARELECTRIC PROPULSION NEP
69
ORION DAEDALUS AND MEDUSA
72
64 INERTIAL ELECTROSTATIC CONFINEMENT AND GASDYNAMIC MIRROR FUSION
75
THE ULTIMATE FUEL
76
66 BIBLIOGRAPHY
79
Twentyfirst century starflight
83
71 LASERMASER SAILING FUNDAMENTALS
84
72 STARSHIP DECELERATION USING THE MAGSAIL
87
83 THE LASER RAMJET
108
84 THE RAMJET RUNWAY
110
85 A TOROIDAL RAMSCOOP
112
86 BIBLIOGRAPHY
115
Exotic possibilities
117
THE POTENTIAL OF MAGNETIC SURFING
118
APPROACHES TO ANTIGRAVITY
122
GENERAL RELATIVITY AND SPACETIME WARPS
126
SOME OTHER EXOTIC IDEAS
128
Of stars planets and life
133
102 METHODS OF IMAGING EXTRASOLAR PLANETS
135
103 EXTRASOLAR PLANETS FOUND TO DATE THAT ORBIT SUNLIKE STARS
138
104 HOW COMMON ARE LIFEBEARING WORLDS?
140
A WAY TO INCREASE THE ODDS
142
106 BIBLIOGRAPHY
143
Life between the stars
145
111 ENVIRONMENTAL OBSTACLES TO INTERSTELLAR FLIGHT AND THEIR REMOVAL
146
112 OPTIONS FOR ONBOARD POWER BETWEEN THE STARS
149
113 CLOSED ENVIRONMENT LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS
150
114 OF WORLDSHIPS AND INTERSTELLAR ARKS
151
THE LONG SLEEP TO a CENTAURI
153
116 BIBLIOGRAPHY
154
Conscious spacecraft
157
CAN THE COMPUTER EAT THE GALAXY?
158
122 THE CRYOGENIC STARCHILD
159
124 BIBLIOGRAPHY
160
Meeting ET
161
131 ARE STARSHIPS DETECTABLE?
162
132 MOTIVATIONS OF STARTRAVELLING EXTRATERRESTRIALS
164
133 BIBLIOGRAPHY
165
Afterword
167
Nomenclature
169
Glossary
175
Index
178
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About the author (2000)

GREGORY L. MATLOFF is an adjunct professor of astronomy and physics at City University of New York and New School University. He has taught astronomy to young people in both the classroom and the field, and is the author of several books on practical astronomy, including Telescope Power (Wiley).

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