Deep-sea Food Chains and the Global Carbon Cycle

Front Cover
Gilbert T. Rowe, Vita Pariente
Kluwer Academic Publishers, Jan 1, 1992 - Science - 400 pages
0 Reviews
Carbon dioxide and other 'greenhouse' gases are increasing in the atmosphere due to the burning of fossil fuels, the destruction of rain forests, etc., leading to predictions of a gradual global warming which will perturb the global biosphere. An important process which counters this trend toward potential climate change is the removal of carbon dioxide from the surface ocean by photosynthesis. This process packages carbon in phytoplankton which enter the food chain or sink into the deep sea. Their ultimate fate is a 'rain' of organic debris out of the surface-mixed layer of the ocean. On a global scale, the mechanisms and overall rate of this process are poorly known. The authors of the 25 papers in this volume present their state-of-the-art approaches to quantifying the mechanisms by which the 'rain' of biogenic debris nourishes deep ocean life. Prominent deep sea ecologists, geochemists and modelers address relationships between data and models of carbon fluxes and food chains in the deep ocean. An attempt is made to estimate the fate of carbon in the deep sea on a global scale by summing up the utilization of organic matter among all the populations of the abyssal biosphere. Comparisons are made between these ecological approaches and estimates of geochemical fluxes based on sediment trapping, one-dimensional geochemical models and horizontal (physical) input from continental margins. Planning interdisciplinary enterprises between geochemists and ecologists, including new field programs, are summarized in the final chapter. The summary includes a list of the important gaps in understanding which must be addressed before the role of the deep-sea biota in global-scale processes can be put in perspective.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

THE ROLE OF DEEPSEA ZOOPLANKTON IN CARBON CYCLES
29
ABUNDANCE AND BIOMASS OF METAZOAN MEIOBENTHOS IN THE DEEP SEA
45
THE ROLE OF BENTHIC FORAMINIFERA
63
POSSIBLE ROLES FOR XENOPHYOPHORES IN DEEPSEA CARBON CYCLING
93
DEEPSEA EPIBENTHIC MEGAFAUNA
125
SOUTH AEGEAN EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN CONTINENTAL SLOPE
139
PRODUCTIONBIOMASS RATIOS SIZE FREQUENCIES
157
ORGANIC CARBON FLUX THROUGH THE BENTHIC COMMUNITY
183
ADENOSINE NUCLEOTIDES AS INDICATORS OF DEEPSEA BENTHIC METABOLISM
237
BENTHIC FOOD WEB FLOWS IN THE SANTA MONICA BASIN
255
PREDICTING COMMUNITY DYNAMICS FROM FOOD WEB STRUCTURE
277
THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF SEA FLOOR
295
USING MONOD KINETICS IN GEOCHEMICAL MODELS
309
THE CHARACTERIZATION OF ORGANIC MATTER
325
PARTICLE EXPORT AND RESUSPENSION FLUXES IN THE WESTERN
339
ADDING BIOLOGY TO ONEDIMENSIONAL MODELS
395

BENTHIC SECONDARY PRODUCTION IN THE DEEP SEA
199
REGIONAL AND GLOBAL SCALES
217
Copyright

Other editions - View all