Defective Bosses: Working for the "dysfunctional Dozen"

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Psychology Press, 1998 - Business & Economics - 169 pages
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If you're one of the billions of people in the world who work for someone else, you'll definitely want to see what's inside Defective Bosses: Working for the “Dysfunctional Dozen.” This how-to, how-not-to, why, and why-not tour guide is packed to the hilt with a bevy of tested and proven survival skills and coping techniques for those of you who are trapped in that daily labyrinth of mind games and self-defeating work rituals--and all because of that slightly off-center superior you have to answer to every day. You'll find twelve of the most common defects presented to you in clear and understandable terms so you can detect the defect, protect state of mind, and correct the problem before your life at the office becomes a complete wreck.

Firmly grounded in psychiatric literature, Defective Bosses takes you to levels of workplace happiness that other similar publications fail to reach. In contrast to other books that lack a solid theoretical base, this comprehensive, systematic look at dysfunctional bosses takes an in-depth look at twelve of the most prevalent disorders managers and superiors inflict on their employees in the workplace, giving equal treatment to each category and providing you with equal strategies for each situation you might encounter. These and other areas will help you turn your dead-end job into a dream occupation:
  • an overview of why we have defective bosses
  • dealing with self-centered bosses (narcissistic, sociopathic, paranoid, and histrionic)
  • handling controlling bosses (authoritarian, obsessive-compulsive, explosive, and passive-aggressive)
  • living with neurotic bosses (masochistic, dependent, depressive, anxious)
  • end-of-the-chapter quizzes to help you diagnose your own boss
“I need it yesterday!” “Can you handle this for me? I've got the company lunch.” “If you don't get this in, it's your job!” If these are all-too-common phrases in your workplace, then you need to make a memo to yourself to order Defective Bosses. Its thorough psychological base and examples gleaned from real-life scenarios will give you so much guidance, advice, and direction for positive change, you'll find that you're the boss when it comes to good departmental relationships and a more mutually enjoyable work environment.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The YouDontTrustMeAnymore
35
The DontWorryAboutBeing
49
CONTROLLING BOSSES
63
The ImSorry ButICant
89
The YouCantMake
99
NEUROTIC BOSSES
113
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Kerry David Carson, Ph.D. is a Professor of Management at the University of Southwestern Louisiana in Lafayette, specializing in organizational behavior.