Defining Jamaican Fiction: Marronage and the Discourse of Survival

Front Cover
University of Alabama Press, 1996 - Literary Criticism - 224 pages
0 Reviews
Marronage - the process of flight by slaves from servitude to establish their own hegemonies in inhospitable or wild territories - had its beginnings in the early 1500s in Hispaniola, the first European settlement in the New World. As fictional personae the maroons continue to weave in and out of oral and literary tales as central and ancient characters of Jamaica's heritage. Attributes of the maroon character surface in other character types that crowd Jamaica's literary history - resentful strangers, travelers, and fugitives; desperate misfits and strays; recluses, rejects, wild men, and outcasts; and rebels in physical and psychological wildernesses. Defining Jamaican Fiction identifies the place of Jamaican fiction in the larger regional literature and focuses on its essential themes and strategies of discourse for conveying these themes.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

2
23
The Jamaican Outsider in the Caribbean Canon
56
4
85
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1996)

Barbara Lalla is Professor of Language and Literature in the Department of Liberal Arts, The University of the West Indies, St Augustine, Trinidad.  Her doctorate is in Medieval Studies, and teaching includes Language History, Literary Linguistics, and Medieval and Postcolonial Literature. Publications include Language in Exile: Three Hundred Years of Jamaican Creole (1990) and Voices in Exile: Jamaican Texts of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (1989), companion volumes both co-authored/co-edited with Professor Jean D'Costa; Defining Jamaican Fiction: Marronage and the Discourse of Survival (1996), and articles on Caribbean literature, discourse and language history. Her historical novel, Arch of Fire, appeared in 1998, and has since been translated into German (Flammedes Land, 2000).

 

 

 

Bibliographic information