Demanding the Cherokee Nation: Indian Autonomy and American Culture, 1830-1900

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U of Nebraska Press, 2004 - History - 327 pages
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Demanding the Cherokee Nation examines nineteenth-century Cherokee political rhetoric to address an enigma in American Indian history: the contradiction between the sovereignty of Indian nations and the political weakness of Indian communities. Making use of a rich collection of petitions, appeals, newspaper editorials, and other public records, Andrew Denson describes the ways in which Cherokees represented their people and their nation to non-Indians after their forced removal to Indian Territory in the 1830s. He argues that Cherokee writings on nationhood document a decades-long effort by tribal leaders to find a new model for American Indian relations in which Indian nations could coexist with a modernizing United States.

Most non-Natives in the nineteenth century assumed that American development and progress necessitated the end of tribal autonomy, that at best the Indian nation was a transitional state for Native people on the way to assimilation. As Denson shows, however, Cherokee leaders found a variety of ways in which the Indian nation, as they defined it, belonged in the modern world. Tribal leaders responded to developments in the United States and adapted their defense of Indian autonomy°to the great changes transforming American life in the middle and late nineteenth century. In particular, Cherokees in several ways found new justification for Indian nationhood in American industrialization.

 

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Contents

A Cherokee Literature of Indian Nationhood
1
The Long and Intimate Connection
15
The CivilWar and Cherokee Nationhood
53
The Cherokees Peace Policy
89
The Okmulgee Council
121
The Indian International Fairs
149
Demagogues Political Bummers Scalawags and Railroad Corporations
173
This New Phase of the Indian Question
201
Epilogue
243
Notes
253
Bibliography
305
Index
321
In the Indians of the Southeast series
328
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About the author (2004)

Andrew Denson is an assistant professor of history at Western Carolina University.

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