Democracy Prevention: The Politics of the U.S.-Egyptian Alliance

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 6, 2012 - Political Science - 279 pages
"For fifteen years the military regime that took power in Egypt in 1952 enjoyed a contentious but respectful bilateral relationship with the United States. After Israel devastated the Egyptian military in the 1967 War, however, Cairo severed diplomatic ties with Washington. , dipYears later, compatible strategic aims brought the two governments back together. While Anwar Sadat strove to restore Egypt's territory and solvency, the White House sought to reduce Soviet influence in the Middle East. A US-Egyptian alliance served both parties, but it took a daring military assault by Sadat to impress the wisdom of the friendship upon the Nixon administration. What followed was one of the most tectonic shifts of the Cold War: the complete return of the Sinai Peninsula to Egypt; a lasting peace between Israel and Egypt, Israel's most formidable regional adversary; and a strategic pact between the United States and Egypt, previously a key client of the Soviet Union. After the Iranian Revolution, Egypt became a component of America's new strategy for preserving its influence over the Persian Gulf"--
 

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Contents

Introduction I
1
Peace before Freedom
15
Mubaraks War on Terrorism
43
The Succession Problem
69
Gaza Patrol
98
Groundswell
123
Conclusion
154
Notes
179
Sources
247
Index
267
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Jason Brownlee is Associate Professor of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. He has been traveling to Egypt and conducting research there for seventeen years. In addition to his previous book, Authoritarianism in an Age of Democratization, Professor Brownlee's writings have appeared in Current History, the Journal of Democracy and numerous scholarly journals. In 2010-11 he was a visiting fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

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