Democracy and Decentralisation in South Asia and West Africa: Participation, Accountability and Performance

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Cambridge University Press, Dec 3, 1998 - Business & Economics - 335 pages
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This book is an in-depth empirical study of four Asian and African attempts to create democratic, decentralised local governments in the late 1980s and 1990s. The case studies of Ghana, Cote d'Ivoire, Karnataka (India) and Bangladesh focus upon the enhancement of participation; accountability between people, politicians and bureaucrats; and, most importantly, on whether governmental performance actually improved in comparison with previous forms of administration. The book is systematically comparative, and based upon extensive popular surveys and local field work. It makes an important contribution to current debates in the development literature on whether 'good governance' and decentralisation can provide more responsive and effective services for the mass of the population - the poor and disadvantaged who live in the rural areas.
 

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Contents

India Karnataka
22
Participation
26
Institutional performance
52
Concluding remarks
80
Bangladesh
85
Participation
89
Institutional performance
111
Concluding remarks
132
Participation
213
Institutional performance
247
Concluding remarks
267
Conclusions
271
Assessing performance
281
Explaining performance
283
a crossnational analysis
289
Democratic decentralisation in comparative perspective
292

Cote dlvoire
136
Participation
148
Institutional performance
176
Concluding remarks
199
Ghana
202
Methodological appendix
305
References
320
Index
331
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Page 1 - Out of 75 developing and transitional countries with populations greater than 5 million, all but 12 claim to have embarked on some form of transfer of political power to local units of government.c However, that does not imply that decentralization itself is good or that the outcomes have always been successful.
Page 330 - Washington DC. 1989, Sub-Saharan Africa: From Crisis to Sustainable Growth, Washington DC.
Page i - Sanford is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Politics at the University of Bristol.
Page 2 - In this new climate, it was not hard to believe that decentralisation combined with democratisation (usually in its electoral, representative form) might provide greater transparency, accountability, responsiveness, probity, frugality, efficiency, equity and opportunities for mass participation - or enough of these to justify fresh attempts at reform.

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