Democracy in America, Volume 1

Front Cover
Sever and Francis, 1863 - Democracy
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wagner.sarah35 - LibraryThing

There are so many ways to consider this book, I almost don't know where to start. First, one can think of it as a rich portrait of the United States in the 1830s, with a focus on political life but ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - KamGeb - LibraryThing

In a course I took the professor took about this book and it sounded very interesting. But when I finally read the book, it was hard to follow and I realized I liked the professor's explanation of the book better. Read full review

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Page 42 - Virginia, do by these presents solemnly and mutually in the presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic, for our better ordering and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid...
Page 53 - This liberty is the proper end and object of authority, and cannot subsist without it ; and it is a liberty to that only which is good, just, and honest.
Page 499 - The Union was formed by the voluntary agreement of the States; and, in uniting together, they have not forfeited their nationality, nor have they been reduced to the condition of one and the same people. If one of the States chose to withdraw its name from the contract, it would be difficult to disprove its right of doing so; and the Federal Government would have no means of maintaining its claims directly, either by force or by right.
Page 388 - There is no country in the whole world in which the Christian religion retains a greater influence over the souls of men than in America...
Page 41 - And for the season it was winter; and they that know the winters of that country know them to be sharp and violent, and subject to cruel and fierce storms, dangerous to travel to known places, much more to search an unknown coast. Besides, what could they see but a hideous and desolate wilderness, full of wild beasts and wild men?
Page 206 - In great centralized nations, the legislator is obliged to give a character of uniformity to the laws, which does not always suit the diversity of customs and of districts...
Page 242 - IN no country in the world has the principle of association been more successfully used, or applied to a greater multitude of objects, than in America.
Page 344 - If ever the free institutions of America are destroyed,. that event may be attributed to the unlimited authority of the majority, which may at some future time urge the minorities to desperation, and oblige them to have recourse to physical force. Anarchy will then be the result, but it will have been brought about by despotism.
Page xvi - The gradual development of the equality of conditions is therefore a providential fact, and it possesses all the characteristics of a divine decree: it is universal, it is durable, it constantly eludes all human interference, and all events as well as all men contribute to its progress.
Page 558 - There are at the present time, two great nations in the world which seem to tend towards the same end, although they started from different points; I allude to the Russians and the Americans.

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