Democracy in Japan

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Takeshi Ishida, Ellis S. Krauss
University of Pittsburgh Pre, 1990 - Political Science - 354 pages
2 Reviews
Following World War II, the American Occupation created Western style democratic institutions in Japan and sought to develop a society and culture that would support a democratic political system.  Now, after four decades, the successes and failures of Japanese democracy can be assessed.  How equal are Japan’s citizens?  To what extent are their views represented in the legislature?  How does Japan handle dissent and protest?  How stable is its democracy?



In closely related and readable essays, thirteen leading experts consider three main components of democracy in Japan - political, social, and economic.  The editors’ introduction provides historical background, making this book accessible and valuable for students, the general reader interested in Japan, as well as the specialist.

 

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Amazing book. perfect comparison analysis.. i love the easy language

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Contents

Democracy in Japan Issues and Questions
3
Prerequisites for Democracy Political and Social Institutions
17
Politics and the Policymaking Process
39
Political Democracy
65
Law and Liberty
67
Political Parties and Political Opposition
89
Democracy and Bureaucracy in Japan
113
Democracy and Local Government in Postwar Japan
139
Education
225
Economic Democracy
253
Corporate Power
255
Industrial Democracy
281
Democratic Consciousness in Japanese Unions
299
Conclusion
325
Japanese Democracy in Perspective
327
Notes on Contributors
343

Protest and Democracy
171
Social Democracy
199
Equality
201

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