Democratic Accountability and the Use of Force in International Law

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Charlotte Ku, Harold K. Jacobson
Cambridge University Press, Feb 13, 2003 - Fiction - 440 pages
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The spread of democracy to a majority of the world's states and the legitimization of the use of force by multilateral institutions such as NATO and the UN have been two key developments since World War II. In the last decade these developments have become intertwined, as multilateral forces moved from traditional peacekeeping to peace enforcement among warring parties. This book explores the experiences of nine countries (Canada, France, Germany, India, Japan, Norway, Russia, UK and US) in the deployment of armed forces under the UN and NATO, asking who has been and should be accountable to the citizens of these nations, and to the citizens of states who are the object of deployments, for the decisions made in the such military actions. The authors conclude that national-level mechanisms have been most important in assuring democratic accountability of national and international decision-makers.
 

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Contents

Broaching the issues
3
The domestic and international context
37
The interface of national constitutional systems with international law and institutions on using military forces changing trends in executive and legisl...
39
Domestic political factors and decisions to use military forces
61
Collective security peacekeeping and ad hoc multilateralism
81
The legal responsibility of military personnel
104
Traditional contributors to international military operations
125
Canada committed contributor of ideas and forces but with growing doubts and problems
127
Germany ensuring political legitimacy for the use of military forces by requiring constitutional accountability
231
Russian Federation the pendulum of powers and accountability
257
France Security Council legitimacy and executive primacy
280
The United Kingdom increasing commitment requires greater parliamentary involvement
300
The United States democracy hegemony and accountability
323
Toward a mixed system of democratic accountability
349
Appendix A
384
Appendix B
399

Norway political consensus and the problem of accountability
154
India democratic poor internationalist
176
Japan moderate commitment within legal strictures
207

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