Demographic Trends and Economic Reality: Planning and Markets in the '80s

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Center for Urban Policy Research, 1982 - Political Science - 154 pages

Population, jobs, and buying-power changes are the locomotives of development. The long-term trends that undergird them are just beginning to be revealed in demographic data. These trends are outlined here in an easily understood, essential book.

You need to know the numbers but also the down-to-earth meaning of the changes in age structure and household composition changes. The revolution in labor force and the economic environment impact every developer and planner. In this volume the data are assembled and uniquely linked to income levels, consumption patterns, housing, and urban and regional development, both in the present—and the future.

This book highlights the "dollars and sense" implications of the big trend lines. It utilizes both Census— and post-Census—material for the most up-to-date compendium of "Need to Know" in the market.

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Contents

Contents
1
AgeStructure Evolution
11
Household Compositional Changes
21
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

George Sternlieb, who holds his doctorate from the Harvard Business School, is the founder and former director of the Center for Urban Policy Research. He is a member of the Census Advisory Committee on Population Statistics, a trustee of the Urban Land Institute, and has served on a number of presidential task forces on urban development.

James W. Hughes is dean of the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University. He is author or co-author of thirty-three books, monographs and articles, generally focusing on housing, demographics, and economic development patterns. In addition, he has given numerous policy briefings both in Washington, DC, and Trenton, NJ, on demographics, housing, and the economy.

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