Departmental Teaching in Elementary Schools

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Page 5 - ... to dwarfishness), and to misdirect the action of the vital organs, which leads to deformity. In regard to the intellect, it suppresses the activity of every faculty ; and as it is a universal law in regard to them all, that they acquire strength by exercise, and lose tone and vigor by inaction, the inevitable consequence is, both to diminish the number of things they will be competent to do, and to disable them from doing this limited number so well as they otherwise might. In regard to the temper...
Page 5 - Creator has impressed upon both body and mind. There is but one motive by which this violence to every prompting of nature can be committed, and that is an overwhelming, stupefying sense of fear. If the world were offered to these children as a reward for this prolonged silence • and inaction, they would spurn it : the deep instinct of selfpreservation alone is sufficient for the purpose. The irreparable injury of making a child sit straight and silent and motionless for three continuous hours,...
Page 120 - ... and training. It aims to discover how the unit-group of the school system — the " class " — can be most effectively handled. The topics commonly included in treatises upon school management receive adequate attention ; the first day of school ; the mechanizing of routine; the daily programme; discipline and punishment; absence and tardiness, etc. In addition to these, however, a number of subjects hitherto neglected in books of this class are presented ; the
Page 5 - ... otherwise might. In regard to the temper and morals, the results are still more deplorable. To command <a child, whose mind is furnished with no occupation, to sit for a long time, silent in regard to speech and dead in regard to motion, when every limb and organ aches for activity ; — to set a child down in the midst of others, whose very presence acts upon his social nature as irresistibly as gravitation acts upon his body, and then to prohibit all recognition of, or communication with his...
Page 17 - ... daily contact with several personalities instead of that all day association with one teacher which often breeds abnormal psychic atmosphere." Authorities are practically unanimous in their contention that "the variety of teachers, equipment, methods and general conditions, the physical relief in changing rooms, the continuity of superior teaching, the greater educative freedom, all serve to stimulate a child to his best endeavor. Nothing is more deadening to a child than to listen to the same...
Page 120 - CRONSON, BERNARD. Methods in Elementary School Studies. By Bernard Cronson, AB, Ph.D., Principal of Public School No. 3, Borough of Manhattan, City of New York. Cloth.
Page 119 - WINTERBURN AND BARR. Methods in Teaching. Being the Stockton Methods in Elementary Schools. By Mrs. Rosa V. Winterburn, of Los Angeles, and James A. Barr, Superintendent of Schools at Stockton, Cal. Cloth, xii + 35S pages.
Page 5 - ... silent in regard to speech and dead in regard to motion, when every limb and organ aches for activity ; — to set a child down in the midst of others, whose very presence acts upon his social nature as irresistibly as gravitation acts upon his body, and then to prohibit all recognition of, or communication with his fellows, is subjecting him to a temptation to disobedience, which it is alike physically and morally impossible he should wholly resist. What observing person, who has ever visited...
Page 120 - ... instruction ; different plans for testing the efficiency of teaching ; a new treatment of incentives based upon modern psychology, and a formulation of the generally accepted principles of professional ethics as applied to schoolcraft. Appendices include plates showing the quality of work that can be expected from pupils of different grades and syllabi of topics and questions for the use of "observation "classes.
Page iii - THAT method of school organization under which each teacher in an elementary school instructs in one subject or in one group of related subjects only is generally known as departmental teaching.

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