Der imaginierte Garten

Front Cover
Günter Oesterle, Harald Tausch
Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2001 - Gardening - 275 pages
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Contents

Vorwort
7
ASSOZIATIONSÄSTHETIK UND GARTENDISKURS IM 18 JAHRHUNDERT
14
Locke Addison Hume und die Imagination des Gartens
23
MICHAEL GAMPER
30
Zwischen allegorischer Entzifferung und Schwärmerei
45
MARCUs SANDL
73
JÖRN GARBER
93
SCHNEIDER
115
JOHANNA GEYERKORDEsCH
135
MICHAEL NIEDERMEIER
155
REINHARD KRÜGER
201
ULF KÜsTER
229
UTE KLOSTERMANN
239
JUTTA HEINZ
253
Autorinnen und Autoren
271
Copyright

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Page 26 - ... this laying up of our ideas in the repository of the memory, signifies no more but this, that the mind has a power in many cases to revive perceptions, which it has once had, with this additional perception annexed to them, that it has had them before. And in this sense it is, that our ideas are said to be in our memories, when indeed they are actually no where, but only there is an ability in the mind when it will to revive them again, and as it were paint them a-new on itself, though some with...
Page 29 - ... we oftentimes find a disease quite strip the mind of all its ideas, and the flames of a fever in a few days calcine all those images to dust and confusion, which seemed to be as lasting as if graved in marble.
Page 27 - For methinks the understanding is not much unlike a closet wholly shut from light, with only some little opening left to let in external visible resemblances or ideas of things without : would the pictures coming into such a dark room but stay there, and lie so orderly as to be found upon occasion, it would very much resemble the understanding of a man in reference to all objects of sight, and the ideas of them.
Page 25 - Thus the ideas, as well as children, of our youth often die before us; and our minds represent to us those tombs to which we are approaching; where though the brass and marble remain, yet the inscriptions are effaced by time, and the imagery moulders away.
Page 24 - WE may observe, that any single circumstance of what we have formerly seen, often raises up a whole scene of imagery, and awakens numberless ideas that before slept in the imagination ; such a particular smell or colour is able to fill the mind, on a sudden, with the picture of the fields or gardens where we first met with it, and to bring up into view all the variety of images that once attended it.

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