Description of a MediŠval Merchant's Mark and Some Remarks Upon Seals of the Same Period

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1878 - Trademarks
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Page 185 - William Wilbeye. 25. — 1403. John de Swerdeston. 26. — 1404. John Bilhawe, Lyster. 27.— 1404. John Byskelee, Mayor 1414 : MP 1412. In the year 1403 a new Charter was granted to the city, by which it was no longer to be governed by four Bailiffs, but by a Mayor and two Sheriffs. 28.— 1406. William Forthe. (?) PLATE III. 1.— 1408. 2.— 1412. Galfridus Bixton, of Norwich. In 1400, Jeffry de Bixton, Will. Blakehommore, and Margery his wife, gave certain limekilns, houses, gardens, &c., in...
Page 209 - This mark appears to have been afterwards used by Stephen Reynbald, as it is against his name, on a seal attached to a deed dated 1518. 18.— 1476. William Pepyr, Alderman, Sheriff 1469. In 1476 he was buried in the chancel, on the North side of the altar : on his gravestone are the effigies of himself and bis wife, Johanna, in brass, together with his mark, which was formerly in the East window. He appears to have lived in the corner house, f abutting South on Pottergate, and fronting the churchyard...
Page 209 - Mackerell, in his manuscript History of Norwich, says, " The Duke of Norfolk had a palace that was a beautiful and noble structure when it was in its glory, and reputed to have been the largest house in England out of London. It was adorned with curious granaries of terras, and a large and spacious Bowling-alley* of the same, at first covered over from the weather, but laid open in the year 1672, by Henry, Duke of Norfolk, who built here a palace anew ; but, not living to see it finished, it remained...
Page 188 - Gresham, his son, afterwards resided there, and entertained Queen Elizabeth on her progress to Norwich in 1578. This mark, with the initials RG, is now on the spandril of an old door at Intwood ; and, on an ancient porch, are the arms of Gresham carved in stone, together with the grasshopper, the well-known crest or cognizance of the family. In 1542, the Corporation sent half a porpoise as a present to Lady Gresham, at Intwood. 4. — 1548. Thomas Lynne, Sheriff 1557, in which year he died. 5. —...
Page 202 - Arms. 3rd. Cheeky, a bend ermine. (Bassingham.) 4th ; and within the yard, above a door, this mark and initials. In a window of this house, now taken away; 1st. * The arms of Rugg ; probably Francis Rugg : he was three times Mayor, and in 1607 was buried at the East end of the North aisle of the church. France and England quarterly ; supporters, a red dragon and gold lion crowned. 2nd. Feathers. 3rd. St. George's cross. 4th. City of Norwich. 5th. Red and white rose united. 6th. per pale ; 1st. per...
Page 216 - There is a handsome hall of the ancient fashion, open to the top of • Wafers used at the celebration of the Eucharist. t A mixture of oil and balsam. (See Blomefield's Norfolk, Vol. IV., p. 431.) the roof, with 2 doors for buttery and pantry, as in college halls, 2 large windows now in part stopped up. In one, in roundels represented in painted glass, the 12 months of the year. In the other window, upper part, in every pane, a curious picture ; as of K. Edwd 3rd, Julius Caesar, Hector of Troy,...
Page 257 - Wyde wyndowes y-wroust y-written full thikke, Schynen with schapen scheldes to schewen aboute, With merkes of marchauntes y-medled bytwene, Mo than twenty and two twyes y-noumbred.
Page 178 - ... and this was the more necessary when very few could read or write ; for it cannot be doubted but the illiterate assistants in a tradesman's warehouse, to whom a written direction would be utterly incomprehensible, would recognize with ease the various Marks which they were in the habit of seeing. These Marks appear to have been in general use for about three centuries, viz., from 1300 to 1600; for though they began about a quarter of a century before the earlier of the dates, and continued as...
Page 170 - Merchants' Marks, which appear to have been copied from the Flemings, during the reign of Edward the Third, and become very common during the fifteenth century, were usually composed of a private cypher, combined with the initials of the owner's name. They were generally used in the great seaports on the East coast of England ; a fact which has been accounted for by the frequent intercourse between those ports and Flanders.
Page 170 - ... and superficial execution. At the close of the twelfth century the introduction of heraldic insignia produced a large class of seals of an exclusively armorial character ; and from this date may be traced an improvement in the design and execution of personal seals. At the commencement of the thirteenth century the legal necessity for seals was thoroughly established ; and it is obvious that at that time there must have been a number of persons who required them for the ordinary transactions...

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