Description of the universal telegraph, for day and night signals

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T. Egerton, 1823 - Signals and signaling - 32 pages
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Page 3 - Telegraph in 1 8 1 o, and he says he did so after having seen and studied the French coast telegraph "since known by the name of the Semaphore, the resemblance of which to my plan immediately struck me. For it had three arms exhibiting positions similar to mine, but placed on separate pivots upon the same post.
Page 9 - ... horizontal and raised into its vertical position by means of a small rope and a small pulley. The arms must be fixed externally, one on each side of the post, and must be exactly counterpoised by means of light frames of open ironwork, which become invisible by day at a little distance...
Page 9 - The two pulleys at top and bottom being finished with great care, perfectly equal, and having projecting teeth or studs fixed in a groove in each to engage the double or open parts of the chain, the telegraphic arm above will always follow to a hair's breadth the movements of an index or lever below, attached to the lower pulley, which has a dial-plate opposite to it, marked on the poet, for the guidance of the operative signal-man...
Page 13 - Jths of the arm in length. The height of the post should be such, that men, or other moveable objects, passing near it, shall not obscure the indicator or arms, when the telegraph is erected on the deck of a ship, or in the field. But when placed on the roof of a permanent signal-house, the projecting part of the post need not exceed the telegraphic arm by more than §rds of the length of the latter. It is desirable in all cases that the telegraphic post should be capable of turning so as to exhibit...
Page 6 - TELEGRAPH, UNIVERSAL.! General Description of the Universal Telegraph. For the day signals, the telegraph consists of an upright post of moderate height, of two moveable arms fixed on the same pivot near the top of it, and of a mark, called the indicator, on one side of it. (See Plate I. fig. 1.) Each arm can exhibit the seven positions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7, exclusive of Нз quiescent position, called 'the stop,' in which it points vertically downwards, and is obscured by the post.
Page 14 - ... circumstances will permit. A post, with two planks for the arms, each worked merely by a couple of strings without pulleys, will constitute a day telegraph, and the addition of lanterns, &c., will convert the same simple apparatus into a nocturnal telegraph. In both cases the arma must be counterpoised...
Page 11 - Telegraphic post, and turns wife it, may be fixed, or disengaged, in a moment, and is peculiarly adapted for ships, and for field service, in which the length of the Telegraphic arm does not exceed from 5 to 6 feet. But at permanent stations on shore, where larger Telegraphs would probably be used, the apparatus for supporting the indicator lamp, should be a permanent fixture, to save the trouble of continually shipping and unshipping it. At such stations, if...
Page 11 - ... (gg), as in fig. 3, which is an elevation of the Universal Telegraph, fitted up for night signals, on a scale larger than that of the former explanatory figures. The apparatus now alluded to, having only one lantern to support, may be made extremely light. The end of the rod drops into a small open mortise at the head of the post, and has a semicircular groove on its lower surface, which is engaged by a horizontal bolt, driven through the sides of the post. A small rope fixed to the end of the...
Page 12 - In this, the light is exhibited in every direction, through я very strong globular glass, to which are fitted a copper top and bottom, pierced with air-holes.* In respect to the dimensions proper for the parts of the Universal Telegraph, we ascertained by experiment that the arms for the day signals should be about 1 foot in length per mile, in order to be distinguished by a common portable telescope of moderate power. This length is computed from the centre of motion to the end of the arm, not...
Page 15 - they are robbing,' 'they are robbed,' and 'they are robbers,' although different in sense, would all be expressed by the same signal in Sir Home Popham's Dictionary. The phrases ' a robber has been executed,' and ' a robbery has been executed,' would also be expressed by the same signal ; and the phrases ' they are going,' and ' they are gone,' would likewise be confounded.

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