Descriptions of Occupations: Mines and Mining

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1918 - Mineral industries - 37 pages
 

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Page 13 - Compiled from data of the US Bureau of Mines and the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Page 13 - ... trained men and to some occupations that might be included under laborers, could be omitted from an analysis for the purpose of vocational education. In the words of the introductory statement, " the object is to furnish detailed descriptions of such occupations as require special training, experience, or education in order to be able to do the work intelligently and efficiently. All such occupations as require but little instruction and experience have been referred to as ' Laborer, underground,...
Page 13 - Laborer, underground, metal mine,' 'Laborer, surface, coal mine,' and 'Laborer, surface, metal mine.' The underlying principle upon which this distinction is made is based upon the fact that many of the occupations at the mines may be recruited without any trouble whatever from the average laborer, the only condition being that he is willing to work underground at coal mines or underground at metal mines.
Page 22 - Qualifications: Physical strength; good health; more than average ability; ability to handle men. He should have large practical experience and a general knowledge of coal-mining conditions as to methods, safety requirements, etc. He should have had experience as pusher...
Page 33 - An apprentice should be able to read and write, and have a knowledge of arithmetic.
Page 35 - Boys on admission must be able to read and write, and have a fair knowledge of the rudiments of grammar. School classified by classics chiefly, but separately for mathematics. School course modified in one or two cases to suit boys
Page 13 - ... code words are used to cover both coal and metal mining, and several of these, referring to technically trained men and to some occupations that might be included under laborers, could be omitted from an analysis for the purpose of vocational education. In the words of the introductory statement, " the object is to furnish detailed descriptions of such occupations as require special training, experience, or education in order to be able to do the work intelligently and efficiently. All such occupations...
Page 31 - One of his duties is to look after the safety of the men as well as to secure the maximum production of coal.
Page 38 - The waste man looks after and keeps clean the airways of a mine, and keeps the walls or brattices in proper condition for.

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