Descriptive Catalogue of the Writings of Sir Walter Scott

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J.B. Lippincott Company, 1898 - 106 pages
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Page 26 - wrote it. Goldsmith, in his epitaph on Cumberland, describes him as, — " A flattering painter, who made it his care " To draw men as they ought to be, not as they are. " His gallants are all faultless, his women divine, "And Comedy
Page 74 - he was the ' Author of Waverley,'" and that " when " he said he was the author, he was the total and undivided author, for, with " the exception of quotations, there was not a single word that was not de" rived from himself or suggested in the course of his reading.
Page 57 - such a hasty" conclusion " as could be shaped out from the story of which Mr. Strutt had laid the "foundation." Chapters iv. and v. by the author of " Waverley" are here given. " Queen-hoo Hall" " was not very successful." QUENTIN DURWARD. 2 vols. (1823) . . Nov. xxxi.
Page 71 - SPORTING TOUR, A, THROUGH THE NORTHERN PARTS OF ENGLAND AND GREAT PART OF THE HIGHLANDS OF SCOTLAND. BY THORNTON, COLONEL THOMAS. (1805) . Pr. xix. 87
Page 37 - for permission to print this with "My Aunt Margaret's Mirror," "The Tapestried Chamber," and " The Death of the Laird's Jock" in " The Keepsake," but regretted " having " meddled in any way with the toy-shop of literature, and would never do "so again, though repeatedly offered very large sums.
Page 14 - fragment, was written by Sir Walter " in 1808, shortly after the publication of his ' Marmion.' " It gives a clear " outline of his early life down to the period of his call to the Bar, July, "1792." The Notes also are by Scott. He removed from Lasswade Cottage to Ashestiel, and thence to Abbotsford. AYRSHIRE TRAGEDY. (1830)
Page 58 - Redgauntlet." Lockhart remarks (see " Life," vol. vii. p. 214) that " with posterity, " assuredly this novel will yield in interest to none of the series; for it con" tains, perhaps, more of the author's personal experiences than any other of "them, or even than all the rest put together." REEVE, CLARA (1725-1803), MEMOIR OF. (1821-5)
Page 26 - is too sweet a morsel for a mortal/ * and, added the acquiescing penitent, "Well, I forgive him; but the deil take you, Donald" (turning to his son), " if you forgive him." CUMBERLAND, RICHARD (1732-1811): JOHN DE LANCASTER: A NoVEL. (1809) ..... Pr. xxviii. 138 This appeared in the
Page 74 - written so much in that department.' ' Scott abandoned the idea, as the " legend would have formed but an unhappy " foundation for a prose story, and must have degenerated into a mere fairy "tale.
Page 30 - Life," vol. viii. pp. 251-52, where is recorded an entry in Scott's diary asserting that he felt assured that it would be easy to swear they were written and that Fielding adopted them from tradition. FLEETWOOD; OR, THE

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