Design And Truth

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Yale University Press, Apr 20, 2010 - Design - 256 pages
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“If good design tells the truth,” writes Robert Grudin in this path-breaking book on esthetics and authority, “poor design  tells a lie,  a lie usually related . . . to the  getting or  abusing of power.”

From the ornate cathedrals of Renaissance Europe to the much-maligned Ford Edsel of the late 1950s, all products of human design communicate much more than their mere intended functions. Design holds both psychological and moral power over us, and these forces may be manipulated, however subtly, to surprising effect. In an argument that touches upon subjects as seemingly unrelated as the Japanese tea ceremony, Italian mannerist painting, and Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello plantation, Grudin turns his attention to the role of design in our daily lives, focusing especially on how political and economic powers impress themselves on us through the built environment.

Although architects and designers will find valuable insights here, Grudin’s intended audience is not exclusively the trained expert but all those who use designs and live within them every day.

 

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Contents

Face to Face with Design
62
8
85
Modes ofSelfDesign
105
Metaphorical Extensions
117
Liberty as a Knowledge Design
134
Corporate Redesign and the Business of Knowledge
150
Designing Time
166
The Design of Private Knowledge
178
Designing Truth
193
Acknowledgments
211
Copyright

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