Design for Environmental Sustainability

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Springer Science & Business Media, Jun 17, 2008 - Technology & Engineering - 304 pages
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Design for Environmental Sustainability is a technical and operative contribution to the United Nations "Decade on Education for Sustainable Development" (2005-2014), aiding the development of a new generation of designers, responsible and able in the task of designing environmentally sustainable products.

Design for Environmental Sustainability provides a comprehensive framework and a practical tool to support the design process. The book offers an organic vision of methodologies, tools and strategies for the integration of environmental requirements into product development. Possible strategies and design guidelines are highlighted, accompanied by a large selection of high-quality environmentally-aware product design case studies.

Divided into four parts, the first part covers environmental sustainability and presents the general guidelines that can be followed to reach it. The second part examines the Life Cycle Design approach and the strategies to minimise consumption of resources, select low environmental impact resources, optimise product life span, extend the life of materials, and design for disassembly. The third part presents methods and tools to evaluate the environmental impact of products (e.g., Life Cycle Assessment) and other support tools for the integration of environmental requirements into real design processes. The fourth and final part describes the historical evolution of sustainability, both in design practice and research.

Design for Environmental Sustainability is an important text for all students, designers and design engineers interested in product development processes.

 

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Contents

Sustainability and Discontinuity
3
12 Sustainable Development and Environmental Sustainability
4
121 Preconditions of Environmental Sustainability
6
13 Bio and Technocycles
8
131 Biocompatibility and Biocycles
9
133 Industrial Ecology and Dematerialisation
10
14 Transition Scenarios
11
A Radical Way of Doing Things Better
12
73 Why Design Intensely Utilised Goods?
135
74 Social and Economic Dimensions of Changes
137
75 Optimisation Services
138
761 Designing for Appropriate Lifespan
139
762 Designing for Reliability
141
764 Facilitating Maintenance
145
765 Facilitating Repairs
148
766 Facilitating Reuse
150

143 Compound Strategy
13
Products Contexts and Capacities
15
22 Productbased Wellbeing
16
222 The Paradox of Light Products
17
223 Lightness as a Nonsufficient but Necessary Condition
18
23 Accessbased Wellbeing
19
232 The Material Ballast of Information
20
233 Service Orientation as a Prerequisite of Sustainability
21
24 Crisis of Local Common Goods
22
242 The Sprawl of Remedial Goods
23
25 Contextbased Wellbeing
24
26 Wellbeing as a Development of Capacity
25
262 Disabling and Enabling Solutions
26
27 The Forces Behind Changes
27
A Social Learning Process
29
33 ConsumersUsers and Coproducers
30
331 The Potential Strength of Consumers
31
332 Critical Consumption
32
35 Active Minorities and Auspicious Cases
33
36 Enterprises and New Forms of Partnership
35
362 New Methods of Running Business
36
363 Ecoefficient Businesses
37
364 From Product to System Ecoefficiency
38
366 Starting from the Results
39
37 The Public Sector and the Rules of the Game
41
372 Amplifying the Feedback
42
373 Supporting the Offer of Alternative Solutions
43
374 Promoting Adequate Communication
44
375 Designating Adequate Economical Costs to Natural Resources
45
38 Designers and Codesigners
46
382 Operative Fields for Design for Sustainability
47
Design for Environmental Sustainability
52
Life Cycle Design
53
43 Product Life Cycle
55
432 Preproduction
56
433 Production
57
434 Distribution
58
44 Additional Life Cycles
59
45 Functional Approach
60
46 Life Cycle Design
61
47 Life Cycle Design Objectives
62
49 The Design Approach
63
410 Strategies of Life Cycle Design
64
411 Interrelations Between the Strategies
65
412 Priorities Among the Strategies
66
413 Design for Disposal
69
414 Environmental Priorities and Disposal Costs
70
415 Current State of Life Cycle Design
71
Minimising Resource Consumption
73
52 Minimising Material Consumption
74
522 Minimising Scraps and Discards
79
523 Minimising Packaging
80
524 Minimising Materials Consumption During Usage
84
525 Minimising Materials Consumption During the Product Development Phase
89
526 Minimising Energy Consumption
90
Selecting Low Impact Resources and Processes
105
62 Selection of Nontoxic and Harmless Resources
106
622 Selecting Nontoxic and Harmless Energy Resources
112
63 Renewable and Biocompatible Resources
117
631 Select Renewable and Biocompatible Materials
118
632 Select Renewable and Biocompatible Energy Resources
125
Product Lifetime Optimisation
131
72 Why Design Longlasting Goods?
132
767 Facilitating Remanufacturing
154
768 Intensifying Use
155
Extending the Lifespan of Materials
159
82 Guidelines
165
821 Adopting the Cascade Approach
166
822 Selecting Materials with the Most Efficient Recycling Technologies
168
823 Facilitating Endoflife Collection and Transportation
170
824 Identifying Materials
172
825 Minimising the Overall Number of Different Incompatible Materials
173
826 Facilitating Cleaning
176
827 Facilitating Composting
177
828 Facilitating Combustion
178
Facilitating Disassembly
181
92 Guidelines
187
921 Reducing and Facilitating Operations of Disassembly and Separation
188
922 Engaging Reversible Joining Systems
191
923 Engaging Permanent Joining Systems that Can Be Easily Opened
193
924 Codesigning Special Technologies and Features for Crushing Separation
194
925 Using Materials that Are Easily Separable After Being Crushed
196
926 Using Additional Parts that Are Easily Separable After the Crushing of Materials
197
System Design for Ecoefficiency
199
102 System Innovation for New Interactions Between Socioeconomic Actors
202
103 The Supply Model of the Product Service System
203
104 Guidelines
204
1041 Services Providing Added Value to the Products Life Cycle
205
1042 Services Providing Final Results for Customers
206
1043 Services Providing Enabling Platforms for Customers
208
105 Strategic System Design for Ecoefficiency
212
Methods and Support Tools for Environmental Sustainability Analysis and Design
213
Environmental Complexity and Designing Activity
215
112 Methods and Tools for Design for Environmental Sustainability
216
Estimating the Environmental Impact of Products Life Cycle Assessment
219
1211 Exhaustion of Natural Resources
220
1213 Ozone Layer Depletion
221
1214 Smog
222
1215 Acidification
223
1217 Toxic Air Soil and Water Pollution
224
1218 Waste
225
1219 Other Effects
226
1221 Life Cycle Assessment
227
1222 Stages of LCA
228
Importance and Limitations
236
Discriminant Power Versus Scientific Reliability
237
First Stages of Development Versus LCA Applicability
238
1226 Developing LCA
239
Environmentally Sustainable Designorienting Tools
243
133 Limitations of Tools that Are Developed for Certain Environmental Goals
245
134 Tools for Product LCD
246
135 Tools for Design for Ecoefficiency
247
The Roadmap and the State of the Art
252
Evolution of Sustainability in Design Research and Practice
253
142 Evolution of Sustainability in Design
255
143 Low Impact Resources Selection
256
144 Product Life Cycle Design
257
145 System Design for Ecoefficiency
258
146 Design for Social Equity and Cohesion
260
147 State of the Art
262
Design Criteria and Guidelines
263
Diagrams of Environmental Impacts
273
References
283
Index
297
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 293 - Directive 2002/95/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on the restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment (RoHS).
Page 287 - Life cycle engineering — challenge in the scope of technology, economy and general regulations.
Page vi - UNESCO is the lead agency, is to integrate the principles, values, and practices of sustainable development into all aspects of education and learning. This educational effort will encourage changes in behaviour that will create a more sustainable future in terms of environmental integrity, economic viability, and a just society for present and future generations.
Page 292 - Sciama D (2006) Life Cycle Design: from general methods to product type specific guidelines and checklists: a method adopted to develop a set of guidelines/checklist handbook for the eco-efficient design of NECTA vending machines. J Cleaner Prod 14(15):1319-1325 Zhang B, Simon M, Dowie T (1993) Disassembly & assembly sequence generation by LPM, DDR/TR 6.
Page 288 - Manzini E., Vezzoli C., Lo sviluppo di prodotti sostenibili. I requisiti ambientali dei prodotti industriali, Maggioli editore, Rimini, 1998.
Page 290 - Consoli, F.. Allen, D.. Boustead, I., Fava, J., Franklin, W., Quay, B., Parrish, R., Perriman, R., Postlewhaite, D., Seguin, J. Vigon, B., 1993. Guidelines for life-cycle assessment: A 'code of practice'.