Despair: a novel

Front Cover
Putnam, 1966 - Fiction - 222 pages
12 Reviews
Extensively revised by Nabokov in 1965--thirty years after its original publication--Despair is the wickedly inventive and richly derisive story of Hermann, a man who undertakes the perfect crime--his own murder.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dbsovereign - LibraryThing

A nightmare of a novel that takes us into the mind of another "unreliable narrator." Like many of Nabokov's novels we can never be sure of what we know since it's based on what the narrator tells us ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Big_Bang_Gorilla - LibraryThing

In which a self-proclaimed mastermind decides that his discovery of his lookalike is his ticket to pulling off a great criminal enterprise. Hermann Karlovich is one of my favorites of Nabokov's ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
13
Section 3
29
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (1966)

One of the twentieth century's master prose stylists, Vladimir Nabokov was born in St. Petersburg in 1899. He studied French and Russian literature at Trinity College, Cambridge, then lived in Berlin and Paris, where he launched a brilliant literary career. In 1940 he moved to the United States, and achieved renown as a novelist, poet, critic and translator. He taught literature at Wellesley, Stanford, Cornell, and Harvard. In 1961 he moved to Montreux, Switzerland, where he died in 1977.

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