Deterritorialisations--: Revisioning Landscapes and Politics

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Mark Dorrian, Gillian Rose
Black Dog Publishing, 2003 - Architecture - 351 pages
1 Review
In recent years, landscape has become increasingly recognised as a topic of central importance to a wide variety of disciplines. To a large degree this recognition has been based upon an expanding appreciation of the political aspects of landscape, its ideological character and effects. Landscapes and Politics is an innovative cross-disciplinary volume of new writing which brings together, in a strategic and productive encounter, a broad variety of critical work currently being done in this field. With 28 papers and five photo essays.

Landscapes and Politics presents material by scholars and practitioners from anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art history, cultural studies, English and American literature, film studies, fine art, geography, history, landscape architecture, philosophy, political science, and religious studies. As an important marker of current methodologies, research and practice across these different disciplinary areas Landscapes and Politics is an invaluable resource. It will be of interest to all those concerned with current discourses and debates on landscape and its representation.

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User Review  - amelish - LibraryThing

I'm not in any sort of position to critique the essays collected here, but can say that they raised some interesting questions and topics. Which I suppose is the whole point of a symposium: "here is some knowledge, collected. now go think about it." Read full review

Contents

Mark Dorrian
188
Ewa KeblowskaLawniczak
212
Jenny lies
234
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

My research interests lie broadly within the field of visual culture. I'm interested in visuality as a kind of practice, done by human subjects in collaboration with different kinds of objects and technologies. Monica Degen, Clare Melhuish and I are starting a new ESRC-funded project in autumn 2011. Architectural atmospheres, branding and the social: the role of digital visualizing technologies in contemporary architectural practice is a two-year ethnographic study of how digital visualizing technologies are being used by architects in two large studios in London, both as part of their design process but also as a way of taking their designs through the planning process. Other work is extending my interest in subjectivities, space and visual practices by exploring experiences of designed urban spaces. I have completed the ESRC-funded project Urban aesthetics: a comparison of experiences in Milton Keynes and Bedford town centres (ESRC grant number RES-062-23-0223) with Dr Monica Degen at Brunel University, in which we compared how people experienced two rather different town centres: Milton Keynes and Bedford. Find more information about the project on the Urban Experience website. The long-term project Doing Family Photography: The Domestic, The Public and The Politics of Sentiment resulted in a book from Ashgate Press in 2010. I've approached family snaps by thinking of them as objects embedded in a wide range of practices. I've been interviewing women with young children about their photos for a long time, and more recently I've looked at the politics and ethics of family snaps moving into more public arenas of display when the people they picture are the victims of violence. The book explores the different 'politics of sentiment' in which family snaps participate in both their domestic spaces in the public space of the contemporary mass media. I'm also interested in more innovative ways to produce social science research, especially using visual materials. I was involved in organising the ESRC Seminar Series 'Visual Dialogues: New Agendas in Inequalities Research' (2010-2012). Please visit the Visual Dialogues project website for more details. I'm a member of the OpenSpace Research Centre.

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