Deutsche gaben

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C. Witter, 1900 - 31 pages
 

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Page ii - ... statistics ever obtained, and the necessary estimates have been made by Government experts. It is also doubtless true that other circumstances contributed to the success of these trained men, but after all reasonable allowances are made, the figures force the conclusion that the more school training the American boy of that period had, the greater were his chances of distinction. How will it be in this century? "It is unnecessary to extend this inquiry to woman.
Page ii - Who's Who" editors, and that only 24 self-taught men succeeded. A boy with only a common school education had, in round numbers, one chance in 9,000. A high school training increased this chance nearly twenty-two times. College education added gave the young man about ten times the chance of a high school boy and 200 times the chance of the boy whose training stopped with the common school. The AB graduate was pre-eminently successful, and the self-educated man was inconspicuous. "From the nature...
Page ii - From the nature of the case," concludes the compiler, "it cannot be claimed that these classifications are exact, but they are based upon the fullest statistics ever obtained, and the necessary estimates have been made by government experts. It is also doubtless true that other circumstances contributed to the success of these trained men, but after all reasonable allowances are made the figures force the conclusion that the more school training the American boy of that period had, the greater were...
Page ii - That from 1800 to 1870 the uneducated boy in the United States failed entirely to become so notable in any department of usefulness and reputable endeavor as to attract the attention of the Who's Who editors, and that only 24 selftaught men succeeded.
Page i - The editors of Who's Who in America have rendered the country a service by inducing more than ten thousand of the men now living in the United States who are 'most notable in all departments of usefulness and reputable endeavor' to report their education. These men have won enviable distinction, and the facts they give will help answer the questions, 'Does education help one to success?
Page i - Omitting the few persons under thirty years old, the report from 10,704 notables shows : Without education, none ; selftaught, 24; home-taught, 278; with common-school training only, 1,066; with high-school training, 1,627; with college training, 7,709, of whom 6,129 were college graduates. That is : From the 1,757,023 of Class 1 no notable reported.
Page i - Class 2 came l,368,one for every 8,81* [24 of these report themselves as self-taught ; 278 as privately taught.] From the 657,432 of Class 3 came 1,627, one for every. . 404 From the 325,613 of Class 4 came 7,709, one for every.
Page ii - ... the American boy of that period had, the greater were his chances of distinction. How will it be in this century? It is unnecessary to extend this inquiry to woman. Education is practically her only door to eminence. DEPARTMENT OP THE INTERIOR, BUREAU OP EDUCATION, WASHINGTON, DC, March 22, 1904.

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