Developing Narrative Structure

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Allyssa McCabe, Carole Peterson
Psychology Press, 1991 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 367 pages
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Effective narration, the telling of stories or recounting of personal experiences, is an art requiring skills that appear crucial for children's language development and literacy acquisition. This volume serves an important purpose because it pulls together the widely scattered literature in the field, exploring the ways in which oral narrative structure develops in children and how it may be facilitated. It presents new empirical studies on genres of narrative, the role narrative structure plays in emergent literacy, the relationship between narrative language and autobiographical memory, and ways in which teachers and parents facilitate or hinder children's narrative development. The empirical research presented here draws from diverse groups, including Hispanic, African-American, and Anglo-American children from rural and urban America and Canada.
 

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Contents

Linking Childrens Connective Use
29
Genre Skills Among First
55
The Development
89
The Recall of Early
137
The Oral Monologue as a Form of Emergent
175
A Longitudinal Study
217
Constraints
255
The Dismantling of Narrative
303
Author Index 353
354
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About the author (1991)

Allyssa McCabe, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. She founded and co-edits the journal Narrative Inquiry and has researched how narrative develops with age, the way parents can encourage narration, cultural differences in narration, as well as interrelationships between the development of narrative, vocabulary, and phonological awareness. She is the recipient (with L. S. Bliss and A. Covington) of the Editor's Award from Contemporary Issues in Communication Science and Disorders, presented at the 1999 Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, San Francisco, CA, for the article Assessing the Narratives of African American Children. Her current work concerns a theoretical approach to early literacy called the Comprehensive Language Approach, which looks at ways that the various strands of oral and written language affect each other in the acquisition of full literacy. With Lynn Bliss, she most recently published Patterns of Narrative Discourse: A Multicultural Lifespan Approach.

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